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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 12 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 8: the Liberator1831. (search)
o secret of his purpose, or his list of subscribers. Meanwhile, the statement must be sufficient to convince you and your friends of the insignificant countenance and support which the paper itself derives from this city. The paper which I read contained, among speculations which I consider atrocious and detestable, others compiled from essays, foreign and domestic, upon the subject of slavery in the abstract; And therefore presumably harmless. The great mass of slaveholders, wrote Mr. Garrison, while they profess to be opposed to slavery in the abstract (would to Heaven there was no slavery but slavery in the abstract!). are incurably attached to practical slavery (Lib. 2.194). and I am persuaded that if upon investigation it should be found that any of our citizens are among the subscribers, they are those who would sincerely disavow the horrid doctrines which openly encourage insurrection and its consequences, etc. What came of further inquiry is related in the letter of
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 17: the disunion Convention.—1857. (search)
e Massachusetts Anti-slavery Society celebrates its twenty-fifth anniversary. Garrison takes part in a disunion Convention held at Worcester under the auspices of T.welve founders of the anti-slavery organization were visible at the festival—Mr. Garrison, who (with Edmund Quincy's aid) presided, and Oliver Johnson among the speaknditional abolition of American slavery. To this toast, proposed by Quincy, Mr. Garrison responded in an historical retrospect, mingled with Lib. 27.6. tributes to met on January 15, with Frank W. Lib. 27.14. Bird of Walpole in the chair, Mr. Garrison being one of the vice-presidents. To the latter it was no disappointment toollow, in the conflicts of the future, the banner of Liberty and Union! Mr. Garrison's speech at the Convention was, in part, as follows: Mr. President, it on the Manifest Destiny of the American Union], wrote Mrs. M. W. Chapman to Mr. Garrison, was, Ms. Oct. 24 (?), 1857. I find by comparison of dates, written a