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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
ng Presidential canvass. I have not witnessed so bad a state of things for forty years, not since the last war with you in 1812-15. At the present moment everything in the Atlantic States is in the hands of the Disunionists, at the two ends of the Union; Butler, Toombs, and the other fireeaters at the South, seeking by their violence to create as much abolitionism at the North as they can, so that it may react in favor of their long-cherished project for a separation of the States; and Garrison, Wendell Phillips, and their coadjutors here striving to excite hatred towards the South, for the same end. It is therefore action and reaction of the worst kind. But the majority of the people, even at the two ends of the Union, are still sound on the great question, and will, I think, make their power felt at last. One favorable sign is, that wise men are become anxious everywhere, and are ready to act, and take responsibility. . . . . Still, I do not deny that there is much look of r
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
e are, so to speak, visibly and tangibly grown great and rich, and are fast growing greater and richer. The two parties—liberal and conservative—into which Europe has long been separated, look upon us in this respect alike, and intelligently enough; but when they go a little further and come to our present position and contests, they divide, and both fall into grave errors according to their respective parties. The liberals demand the abolition of slavery, much in the same sense in which Garrison demands it, and if this cannot be effected, would gladly see the North separated from the South, not at all comprehending the consequences of disunion to the whole country, or its fatal effects on the slave. Their philanthropy, from the days of the French Republic, has been an important part of their political judgments and systems at home, though not always a wise or consistent part of them, and they carry it now vehemently into their opinions of us, whom they have been accustomed to look