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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: no. 19
Boylston place
: later Lyrics --1866; aet. 47 (search)
nd Noes are called for and the immediate consideration receives a good majority. Fessenden now makes his speech, reads the passage from the President's speech, calling the committee of fifteen a directory,--comments fully on the powers of Congress, the injustice of the President and his defiant attitude.... He has force as debater, but no grasp of thought.... In the evening I read the first half of Limitations to a very small circle. A Republican caucus took all the members of Congress. Garrison also lectured. I was sorry, but did my best and said, God's will be done. But I ought to have worked harder to get an audience. February 25. ... Rode with Lieber Dr. Francis Lieber, the eminent German-American publicist. as far as Baltimore. He heard Hegel in his youth and thinks him, as I do, decidedly inferior to Kant, morally as well as philosophically .... The laws and duties of society rest upon a supposed compact, but this compact cannot deprive any set of men of rights
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 16: the last of Green Peace 1872-1876; aet. 53-57 (search)
o be our happiest festivals through many happy years. Monday, June 2, was the day she had appointed as Mothers' Peace Day, her annual Peace Festival. The day of many prayers dawned propitious, and was as bright and clear as I could have wished. She was up early, and found the hall beautifully decorated with many fine bouquets, wreaths, and baskets, the white dove of Peace rising above other emblems. There were two services, morning and evening, and many speakers. Mr. Tilden and Mr. Garrison both did nobly for me.... Thank God for so much! She had the great joy of hearing that the day was celebrated in other countries besides her own. In London, Geneva, Constantinople, and various other places, services were held, and men and women prayed and sang in behalf of peace: this she counted among the precious things of the year, and of several years to come. June 6. Quiet at last, and face to face with the eternal Gospel. Weary and confused, anxious to wind up my business wel
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 17: the woman's cause 1868-1910 (search)
id, without bitterness or extravagance. On the day of the meeting she strayed into Horticultural Hall in her rainy-day suit, with no idea of taking any active part in the proceedings. Indeed, she had hoped to remain unnoticed, until summoned by an urgent message to join those who sat upon the platform; reluctantly she obeyed the summons. With this simple action the old order changed for her. On the platform were gathered the woman suffrage leaders, some of whom she already knew: William Lloyd Garrison, Wendell Phillips, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, James Freeman Clarke; veteran captains of Reform, her husband's old companions-in-arms. Looking in their steadfast faces, she felt that she belonged with them; that she must help to draw the car of progress, not drag like a brake on its wheel. Beside these were some unknown to her. She saw now for the first time the sweet face of Lucy Stone, heard the silver voice which was to be dear to her through many years. Here stood the true w
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 2: a Roman winter--1878-1879; aet. 59-60 (search)
as it could well be. Little sleep for any of us. Glad to see that Lord Hartington has spoken in favor of the Greeks, censuring the English Government. February 26.... Sir Henry Layard and I tStea-tSte on deck, looking at the prospect — he coveting it, no doubt, for his rapacious country, I coveting it for liberty and true civilization. The spring was spent in Italy. In May they came to London. May 29. Met Mr. William Speare.... He told me of his son's death, and of that of William Lloyd Garrison. Gallant old man, unique and enviable in reputation and character. Who, oh who can take his place? Show us the Father. The last weeks of the London visit were again too full for any adequate account of them to find its way into her letters or journals. She visited London once more in later years, but this was her last long stay. She never forgot the friends she made there, and it was one of the many day-dreams she enjoyed that she should return for another London season. Som
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4:
241 Beacon Street
: the New Orleans Exposition 1883-1885; aet. 64-66 (search)
d on stone floors, each single one divided from those on either side of it by a stone partition. Francis Marion Ward, died September 3rd, 1847. Erected by William Morse, dear Marion's friend. May 16. Gave my talk to the colored people, soon after two in the afternoon in their department. A pretty hexagonal platform had been arranged. Behind this was a fine portrait of Abraham Lincoln, with a vase of beautiful flowers [gladiolus and white lilies] at its base. I spoke of Dr. Channing, Garrison, Theodore Parker, Charles Sumner, John A. Andrew, Lucretia Mott, and Wendell Phillips, occupying about an hour. They gave me a fine basket of flowers and sang my Battle Hymn. Afterwards the Alabama cadets visited us. We gave them tea, cake and biscuits and I made a little speech for them. Winter and spring passed rapidly, each season bringing fresh interest. The picturesqueness of New Orleans, the many friends she made among its people, the men and women gathered from every corner of
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 8: divers good causes 1890-1896; aet. 71-77 (search)
he Russian patriots in their efforts to obtain for their country political freedom and self-government. Its circular was signed by Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Julia Ward Howe, John Greenleaf Whittier, James Russell Lowell, George Kennan, William Lloyd Garrison, Henry I. Bowditch, F. W. Bird, Alice Freeman Palmer, Charles G. Ames, Edward L. Pierce, Frank B. Sanborn, Annie Fields, E. Benjamin Andrews, Lillie B. Chace Wyman, Samuel L. Clemens, and Joseph H. Twitchell. James Russell Lowell, writstant lands the shelter of the blessed Cross, and of all that it stands for, and let us make it availing once and forever. Soon after this the Friends of Armenia organized as a society, she being its president. Among its members were William Lloyd Garrison, Henry Blackwell and his devoted daughter Alice, and M. H. Gulesian. Singly or in company they went about, through Massachusetts, holding meetings, rousing the people to aid in the protest of Christendom against heathendom, of mercy agai
, 86. Fuller, Margaret, I, 69, 72, 87, 346; I, 76, 84, 85, 86, 142; II, 404, 405. Furness, W. H., I, 304. Gainsborough, Lady, nx, 6. Gallup, Charles, II, 310. Galveston, II, 279. Gambetta, Leon, II, 25. Garcia method, I, 43. Gardiner, I, 122, 163, 194, 337. Gardiner, J. H., II, 267. Gardner, Mrs., Jack, I, 70, 82, 150, 182, 192. Garfield, J. A., II, 69. Garibaldi, Giuseppe, II, 242. Garrett, Thomas, I, 151. Garrison, F. J., II, 187, 218, 411. Garrison, W. L., I, 240, 345, 362; II, 45, 108, 187, 190. Gautier, Sefior, I, 325, 332. Gay, Willard, I, 298. Gayarre, Judge, II, 103. Geddes, Pres., II, 357. General Federation of Women's Clubs, I, 294, 295, 384; II, 182, 195, 207, 379. Geneva, I, 278, 345; I, 20, 22, 26. Gennadius, John, II, 6. George I, II, 44. George IV, I, 262. George, Henry, II, 247. Georgetown, I, 12. Germany, I, 147, 197; II, 18, 19. Gethsemane, II, 41. Gettysburg, I, 189. Giachetti,