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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 41 11 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Martin Witherspoon Gary or search for Martin Witherspoon Gary in all documents.

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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
f Gaines' Mill were with Hood and Longstreet. The brigades of Hood and Law composed Whiting's gallant division, which had marched from Ashland as the advance of Jackson's corps. They went into battle in the late afternoon, after A. P. Hill had been fighting for two hours. While waiting for Jackson, Lee ordered Longstreet to make a feint on the right, which became an assault, Whiting coming up in time to join on Longstreet's left. With Hood was the Hampton legion infantry, under Lieut.-Col. M. W. Gary, and with Longstreet was R. H. Anderson's South Carolina brigade. These troops had the honor of taking part in Longstreet's and Whiting's final charge along the front and flank of the Federal left, and were among the first to gain the coveted crest and pierce and turn his flank, capture his artillery and decide the day. Hood moved to the final assault with Hampton's legion on his left. On the left of the legion was Law's splendid brigade. Immediately on Hood's right was Pickett
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
d north of it. Wofford, who commanded Hood's right brigade, refers to his advance against a battery at or east of the Chinn house, when the Holcombe legion (of Evans' brigade) came up to his support and fought with much spirit and gallantry. Colonel Gary, the commander of the Hampton legion infantry, in his report says: We were then [Wofford's brigade] hotly engaged around the Chinn house, where the brigade captured several pieces of artillery. At this place the brigade of General Evans came up in gallant style and relieved us. Evidently the Chinn house, which stood about one mile southwest of Groveton, formed the center of the theater of battle for the brigades of Jenkins and Evans and the Hampton legion infantry, under Colonel Gary. These commands carried their battle for a half mile east of the Chinn house, when darkness checked and ended their advance. Over the space indicated the South Carolinians fought with steady courage, attesting their devotion by the sacrifices of t
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
Col. John Bratton commanded Jenkins' brigade, which joined Longstreet after Chickamauga. The First regiment was under command of Col. F. W. Kilpatrick; the Second Rifles, of Col. Thomas Thompson; the Fifth, of Col. A. Coward; the Sixth, of Col. M. W. Gary, and the Palmetto Sharpshooters, of Col. Joseph Walker. In October, 1863, Rosecrans was replaced by Thomas, Grant became commander-in-chief in the West, and prompt efforts were made by them to relieve Chattanooga. On Longstreet's part Lal battle with Sheridan at Trevilian, Butler's South Carolina brigade opened the attack and was distinguished throughout. Among the wounded was Colonel Aiken, of the Sixth cavalry. Before the battle of Nance's Shop, Hampton was joined by Brig.-Gen. M. W. Gary, with a brigade including the Hampton legion cavalry and Seventh South Carolina cavalry. Gary opened the battle at Nance's shop and contributed materially to the victory. Meanwhile other gallant South Carolinians had been on duty unde
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 20: (search)
ps: First regiment (provisional army), Lieut.-Col. A. P. Butler; Twelfth, Capt. J. C. Bell; Thirteenth, Col. I. F. Hunt; Fourteenth, Lieut.-Col. Edward Croft; Orr's rifles, Lieut.-Col. J. T. Robertson. Brig.-Gen. William H. Wallace's brigade, of Johnson's division, Lieut.-Gen. R. H. Anderson's corps: Seventeenth, Capt. E. A. Crawford; Eighteenth, Lieut.-Col. W. B. Allison; Twenty-second, Col. William G. Burt; Twenty-third, Lieut.-Col. John M. Kinloch; Twenty-sixth, Maj. Ceth S. Land; Holcombe legion. In the cavalry under Fitzhugh Lee, were the Seventh regiment, Col. A. C. Haskell, and the Hampton legion, Lieut.-Col. R. B. Arnold, of Brig.-Gen. M. W. Gary's brigade, the last troops to leave the capital of the Confederacy. With the artillery were the South Carolina batteries of Capt. H. R. Garden, Lieut. E. L. Purse (Fickling's), and Capt. T. E. Gregg. Wallace's brigade suffered severely at the battle of Five Forks, only a remnant marching thence to Appomattox Court House.
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
noted chieftains in a hand-to-hand fight. For this he was voted a handsome sword by the legislature of South Carolina. In 1860 he was married to a sister of Gen. M. W. Gary, of Abbeville county. He resigned from the old army in February, 1861, being then stationed in Texas, and taking farewell of his colonel, Robert E. Lee, procative city of Charleston, and devoted himself to the profession of civil engineering. In 1898 he offered his services for the war with Spain. Brigadier-General Martin Witherspoon Gary Brigadier-General Martin Witherspoon Gary was born in 1831 at Cokesbury, Abbeville county, the third son of Dr. Thomas Reeder Gary. He was edBrigadier-General Martin Witherspoon Gary was born in 1831 at Cokesbury, Abbeville county, the third son of Dr. Thomas Reeder Gary. He was educated at the South Carolina college and Harvard college, graduating at the latter institution in 1854. Then studying law he was admitted to the bar in 1855, and soon acquired distinction in both law and politics. As a member of the South Carolina legislature in 1860 and 1861, he advocated secession, and when the ordinance was en
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
care of those lines as far as the White house. Gary's brigade was the last of Lee's troops to crossf officers, among whom were Generals Rosser and Gary, his horse was killed under him, greatly to hisficer. The end of the war found him still with Gary's command, at Greensboro. Since the war Coloneh Carolina cavalry, serving in Virginia, in General Gary's brigade. He took part in innumerable min the honor of being one of the guards under General Gary to escort President Davis in his retreat, rthey were dismissed at Yorkville, S. C., by General Gary. After the close of the war Mr. Ellison refind him, and joined the cavalry brigade of General Gary. With about fifty others, he was detailed d surgeon of the Hampton legion infantry, Col. M. W. Gary commanding, Jenkins' brigade, Longstreet' accept it. He was detailed as a scout by Gen. M. W. Gary, under orders of General Lee, in 1864, anhe mounted detail was assigned to duty in Gen. M. W. Gary's brigade, and from that time until the s[7 more...]