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ured before they had become seasoned by life in the camps. Some relapsed almost at once into helpless and hopeless apathy, caring for nothing, thinking of nothing except the homes and friends they had left. Huddled in corners they sat for hours Confederate prisoners of war in the North. Books and reading matter were evidently available to these Confederates in Fort Warren, 1864. The men in this photograph are C. T. Jenkins, seated on the left; W. W. Helm, standing behind him; R. H. Gayle, in the center with the pipe, and I. Kensfick, seated, with a paper in his hand. Behind him stands Orderly Carey. The only signs of prison are the massive walls and the sergeant on guard with his gun. Many Confederate civilians as well as prominent officers were confined in this stronghold, one of the forts guarding the port of Boston, during the course of the war. Martial law reigned supreme in those days so far as regarded men with Southern sentiments, but once in Fort Warren the pris
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
vessel was kept running between Bermuda and Wilmington, and made some fifteen to eighteen successive trips before she was finally captured—the first twelve with the regularity of a packet. She was commanded first by Captain Wilkinson, of the navy. Soon the Cornubia, named the Lady Davis, was added, and ran as successfully as the R. E. Lee. She had the capacity of about four hundred and fifty bales, and was during the latter part of her career commanded also by a former navy officer, Captain R. H. Gayle. These vessels were long, low and rather narrow, built for swiftness, and with their lights out and with fuel that made little smoke they contrived to slip in and out of Wilmington at pleasure, in spite of a cordon of Federal cruisers eager for the spoils of a blockade-runner. Other vessels— the Eugenia, a beautiful ship, the Stag, and several others were added, all devoted to carrying ordnance supplies, and finally general suplies. To supervise shipments at Bermuda, to which poin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Bureau of foreign supplies. (search)
vessel was kept running between Bermuda and Wilmington, and made some fifteen to eighteen successive trips before she was finally captured—the first twelve with the regularity of a packet. She was commanded first by Captain Wilkinson, of the navy. Soon the Cornubia, named the Lady Davis, was added, and ran as successfully as the R. E. Lee. She had the capacity of about four hundred and fifty bales, and was during the latter part of her career commanded also by a former navy officer, Captain R. H. Gayle. These vessels were long, low and rather narrow, built for swiftness, and with their lights out and with fuel that made little smoke they contrived to slip in and out of Wilmington at pleasure, in spite of a cordon of Federal cruisers eager for the spoils of a blockade-runner. Other vessels— the Eugenia, a beautiful ship, the Stag, and several others were added, all devoted to carrying ordnance supplies, and finally general suplies. To supervise shipments at Bermuda, to which poin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A sketch of the life of General Josiah Gorgas, Chief of Ordnance of the Confederate States. (search)
. Soon the Cornubia, named the Lady Davis, was added, and ran as successfully as the R. E. Lee. She had the capacity of four hundred and fifty bales, and was, during the latter part of her career, commanded also by a former navy officer, Captain R. H. Gayle. These vessels were long, low, and rather narrow, built for swiftness, and with their lights out, and with fuel that made little smoke, they contrived to slip in and out of Wilmington at pleasure, in spite of a cordon of Federal cruisers,his character as a Christian gentleman, faithful to every trust. Many tributes were paid to his memory. Judge John A. Campbell writes: My acquaintance with General Gorgas, commenced after his marriage with the daughter of my friend, Judge Gayle, of Alabama, in 1853. He had graduated with honor at the Military Academy at West Point. He had served with credit in the Mexican War; and was then connected with the Ordnance Department of the United States. After the formation of the Conf
's Farms, Va., I., 366. Garrard, K.: III., 105. 328; IV., 326. Garrard, T. T., X., 207. Garrott, J. W., X., 255. Gartrell, L. J., X., 265. Gary, M. W., X., 285. Gas-generators for balloons, VIII., 374. Gassaway, F. H., IX., 196-199, 201. Gaston, C. A., VIII., 364. Gate City guard, Atlanta, Ga. , IX., 159. Gates, H., V., 33. Gatlin, R. C., X., 279. Gay and Happy, IX., 348. Gay and Happy Still, IX., 186, 349. Gayle, R. H., VII., 135. Gaylesville, Ala., III., 218. Geary, J. W.: II., 256, 258, 300, 302, 318, 320, 346; III., 125; V., 132; X., 4. Gee, Major VII., 92; acquittal of, VII., 180. Gemsbok,, U. S. S., I., 362. General Officers, Roster of Confederate and Union, X., 301; Union army, X., 302-317; Confederate army, X., 318-321. General Orders Nos. 100 and 207, VII., 112. General Beauregard,, C. S. S.: I., 241, 242 seq.; VI., 85, 222. General Bragg,, C. S. S
he Beast) had been entrusted with the whole business of exchange, and he flattered himself that his urbanity and courtesy would eventually prevail in persuading the rebel authorities to exchange on fair and honorable terms; that is to say, swap off his dear nigger friends for Southern white men: Commanders W. A. Webb and J. D. Johnston; Lieutenant Commanding P. W. Murphy; Lieutenants W. T. Glassell, W. L. Bradford, J. W. Alexander, A. D. Wharton, C. W. Read, A. Barbot, G. H. Arledgo, R. H. Gayle and — Hasker; Acting Masters T. L. Wrage, R. H. Murden, W. W. Austin and — Hernandez; First Lieutenant of Marines James Thurston; First Assistant Engineers L. C. King, W. L. Morrill and E. H. Browne; Second Assistant Engineer L. C. West; Assistant Paymaster W. B. Micon; Midshipmen G. H. Williamson and J. A. Peters; R. Annan, W. W. Austin, F. H. Bonneau, E. H. Brown, John E. Billups, Master's Mate; T. B. Bevill, Samuel Brockington, W. Beall, Thomas Butters, A. G. Bird, Oliver Bowen, J. W.