Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for John W. Geary or search for John W. Geary in all documents.

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or. A meeting was accordingly held, which resolved that The Observer ought to be continued, while the question of retaining Mr. Lovejoy as its editor was discussed through two or three evenings, but left undecided. Meantime, while he was absent, attending a meeting of the Presbytery, his new press — the third which he had brought to Alton within a little more than a year — arrived on the 21st of September, was landed about sunset, and immediately conveyed by his friends to the warehouse of Geary & Weller. As it passed along the streets--There goes the Abolition press! Stop it! Stop it! was cried, but no violence was attempted. The Mayor, apprised of its arrival and also of its peril, gave assurance that it should be protected, and asked its friends to leave the matter entirely in his hands, which they did. A constable was posted by the Mayor at the door of the ware-house, with orders to remain until a certain hour. He left at that hour; and immediately ten or twenty ruffians,
4: so that Mr. Buchanan, though he had a very decided plurality, lacked 377,629 votes of a majority over both his competitors. Of the electors, however, he had 174--a clear majority of 60. Major Breckinridge was, of course, chosen Vice-President by the same vote. The disturbed and distracted condition of Kansas, resulting from the efforts of her Missouri neighbors to force Slavery upon her against her will, necessarily attracted the early attention of Mr. Buchanan's Administration. John W. Geary — the third or fourth of her Territorial Governors — had recently resigned and left in disgust, and the selection of a successor was an obvious and urgent duty. The President's choice fell on Hon. Robert J. Walker, formerly Senator from Mississippi, and Secretary of the Treasury under President Polk, who accepted the post with considerable reluctance. Frederick P. Stanton, for ten years a representative in Congress from Tennessee, was associated with him as Secretary. Meantime, the
ence distributed to the several camps assigned them on either side of the Potomac, until the mere bulk of our quiescent forces, the necessity for ground whereon to station them, compelled an advance of our lines — the light troops covering the Rebel front retiring whenever pressed. Lewinsville was reoccupied by our army on the 9th, Vienna on the 16th, and Fairfax Court House on the 17th of October; the Confederates recoiling without firing a shot to Centerville and Manassas. On the 16th, Gen. Geary, under orders from Gen. Banks, in Maryland, advanced to and captured Bolivar Hights, overlooking Harper's Ferry. Leesburg, the capital of Loudoun county, Va., was mistakenly reported evacuated by the Confederates on the 17th; Gen. McCall, with a considerable Union force, moving up the right bank of the Potomac to Dranesville, whence his scouts were pushed forward to Goose Creek, four miles from Leesburg. On the 19th and 20th, McCall made two reconnoissances in the direction of Leesburg,
aves, 107; 515. Gaulden, W. B., of Ga., in Dem. Convention, 316-17. Gauley Bridge, burnt by Gen. Wise, 524. Gauley Mount, Rosecrans's attempt on, 526. Geary & Weller, in the Alton riots, 137. Geary, Gen., captures Bolivar Hights, 620. Geary, John W., Governor of Kansas, 249. Gen. Armstrong, the privateer, 603.Geary, Gen., captures Bolivar Hights, 620. Geary, John W., Governor of Kansas, 249. Gen. Armstrong, the privateer, 603. Genius of Universal Emancipation, The, 112. George IV., Manifesto of Jan. 9th, 1813, 607. Georgia, settlement of, by Oglethorpe, 31; opposition to, and introduction of, Slavery, 32; Darien Resolutions on Slavery, 83; concurrence of, in the Declaration of Independence, 35; slave population in 1790; troops furnished during Geary, John W., Governor of Kansas, 249. Gen. Armstrong, the privateer, 603. Genius of Universal Emancipation, The, 112. George IV., Manifesto of Jan. 9th, 1813, 607. Georgia, settlement of, by Oglethorpe, 31; opposition to, and introduction of, Slavery, 32; Darien Resolutions on Slavery, 83; concurrence of, in the Declaration of Independence, 35; slave population in 1790; troops furnished during the Revolution, 36; her territorial claims. 37; cedes her territory, 50; in connection with the Cotton Gin, 63 to 65; Gov. Troup sympathizes with the Nullifiers, 100; her perfidious treatment of the Indians, 102 to 106; 108; she offers a reward for the arrest of Garrison, 122; withdraws from the Democratic Convention, 315; Mr. Gau