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The Daily Dispatch: May 18, 1864., [Electronic resource], Operations around Richmond — the battle not renewed yesterday — firing at Chaffin's Bluff — another steamer destroyed in St. John's river, &c. (search)
correspondent, published elsewhere. No collision has taken place between the confronting armies since the battle of Thursday last. Condition of General Jenkins. A private dispatch was received yesterday from Dublin Depot, stating that Brig. Gen, A. C drukles was improving, with every prospect of recovery from his wound received in the recent fight near that place. Another steamer blown up by a torpedo. The Yankee steamers are in bad luck in the Florida rivers. The following ow Jacksonville. She had two guns aboard, and was lowing a schooner. The latter escaped. It is not known how many lives were lost. This is the third steamer that has met this fate in St. Johns river in the last forty days. Samuel Jones, Maj Gen. A raiding party in Mississippi. The Adjutant General yesterday received the following official dispatch from General S. D. Lee: Demopolis, May 16, 1864. To Gen. S. Cooper. A raiding party from Vicksburg, infantry and cavalr
day last there has been no general engagement. On Saturday night the enemy withdrew from the front on our left, and moved their troops over to the Telegraph road, seizing the Massaponax, and massing a considerable force on our front. During the day yesterday Gen Anderson swung his forces around on our right, (the enemy's left,) and found the enemy "clean gone."--This required new dispositions on our part, which were accordingly made. In making this advance for the purpose of reconnaissance Gen. A.'s forces recaptured thirteen caissons and twenty-one gun carriages. These were the caissons and the gun carriages which were taken from Johnson's division on Thursday last. The enemy, it is supposed, hauled the guns away in wagons, and left the caisson and carriages for want of horses to take them off. To-day I rode over the battle-field in front of Fields's front and found a large number of dead Yankees scattered everywhere about over the field. As usual, their clothing had been