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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 156 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 48 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 46 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 23 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 17 17 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 15 3 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 14 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 12 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 12 0 Browse Search
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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
erdstown, 139, 162, 253-54, 284, 408-09-10 Sheridan, General (U. S. A.), 40, 371, 379, 406-411, 414, 419, 427, 430, 433, 437, 441, 452-53, 456, 459, 461, 465-66, 475 Sherman, General (U. S. A.), 40, 393 Shields, General (U. S. A.), 241, 399, 475 Shippensburg, 263, 270 Sigel, General (U. S. A.), 102-03, 112, 158, 369, 370, 383-84, 393-94, 396, 399 Silver Spring, 389, 395 Skinner, Lieutenant Colonel, 80 Slaughter's Mountain, 93, 94, 96, 97, 101 Sloan's Regiment, 31 Smith, Captain, 20 Smith, Colonel Geo. H., 49, 386, 389 Smith, Colonel W. D., 50, 193, 333, 423 Smith, Colonel Wm., 32, 106, 120, 125-26-27, 142, 147, 153 Smith, General E. K., 33, 36, 38, 51, 52, 157, 468 Smith, General G. W., 51, 56, 58, 63 Smith, General, Wm., 186, 188, 191, 206, 221-22, 224-228, 230, 232- 234, 239, 242-43, 247-48-49, 253, 259, 267-272, 273, 275 Smith, Governor of Virginia, 306 Smithfield, 383, 408, 410, 414 Smithtown, 254 Smythe County, 466 Snicker's Ferry, 396 Snicker's Gap, 164,
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 16: Secession of Virginia and North Carolina declared.--seizure of Harper's Ferry and Gosport Navy Yard.--the first troops in Washington for its defense. (search)
Eberle, Wm. H. Hodgson, Ernst T. Ellrich, Amos Forseman, C. F. Umberhauer, James Sammon, Wm. R. Roberts, Jonas W. Rich, Charles Weber, Terrence Smith, F. A. Schoener, William Pugh, Frank Hanley, James Smith, Geo. W. Mennig, James Marshall, Ira Troy, Uriah Good, Wm. Irving, Patrick Curtin, John Burns, Edward McCabe, Fred. Seltzer, John Donegan, John Mullens, John Lamons, Wm. McDonald, Geo. W. Garber, F. W. Simpson, Alexander Smith, David Dilly, George Shartle, A. D. Allen, Charles F. Garrett, Geo, A. Lerch, James Carroll, John Benedict, Edmund Foley, Thomas Kelley, John Eppinger, John Rouch, David Howard, Jeremiah Deitrich, William Weller, Wm. A. Christian, Mark Walker, Ralph Corby, Henry Mehr, F. Goodyear, Wm. Carl, Anthony Lippman, John P. Deiner, Wm. A. Beidleman, Chas. J. Shoemaker, Jas. Donegan, Herman Hauser, Louis Weber, Thomas, H. Parker, John Howell, Henry Yerger, Wm. Davenport, James Landefield, James R. Smith, Michael Foren, Alex. Smith, W. M. Lashorn, Levi Gloss, Samuel He
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 31: operations of Farragut's vessels on the coast of Texas, etc. (search)
r as the mouth of the Teche and return by the lake. Disobeying this order, Acting-Master Peterson attempted to return to Berwick Bay by the way of Atchafalaya. After passing the mouth of the Teche lie was attacked from shore by field-pieces and sharp-shooters. The men fought well, and the action lasted two hours and three-quarters. The captain of the Diana was killed early in the action, and his executive officer, Acting-Master's Mate Thomas G. Hall,was mortally wounded; also Master's Mate Geo. C. Dolliver and Engineer Jas. McNally, leaving only one officer (Master's Mate Charles P. Weston), who carried on the fight and behaved most admirably. The tiller-ropes were shot away and the engine disabled so that the Diana became unmanageable and drifted ashore, when it was impossible to longer defend her. As soon as the firing was heard at the bay, the Calhoun, Acting-Master M. Jordan, was sent into the lake to ascertain the cause of it. She arrived at the mouth of the Atchafalaya
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
r, C. M. Guild; Acting-Masters, J. S. Watson, W. H. Brice and J. A. Bullard; Ensigns, Yates Sterling and J. H. Sands; Acting-Ensigns, L. H. White and T. H. Wheeler; Acting-Master's Mate, T. D. Wendell; Engineers: Acting-Chief, Nelson Winans; Second-Assistant, E. A. Magee; Acting-Second-Assistant, J. S. Kelleper; Third-Assistants, D. M. Fulmer, F. W. Towner and William Bond; Boatswain, J. H. Polley; Gunner, George Edmonds. *Ticonderoga--Second-rate. Captain, Charles Steedman; Lieutenant, Geo. B, White; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, L. G. Vassallo, Surgeon, C. J. Cleborne; Paymaster, H. M. Denniston; Ensigns, W. W. Maclay, A. S. Crowningshield and Geo. W. Coffin; First-Lieutenant of Marines, C. F. Williams; Acting-Master's Mates, Wm. Charleton, Jr., E. A. Sibell, Wm. Cooper and L. Norton: Engineers: Chief, T. J. Jones; Second-Assistant, H. H. Barrett; Acting-Second-Assistants, R. I. Middleton and M. Smith; Acting-Third-Assistants, O. Bassett, H. M. Noyes, M. W. Thaxter and S. J. Ho
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 55: operations of the Mississippi Squadron in the latter part of 1864 and in 1865. (search)
cob Rutherford; Acting-Master's Mate, Henry Van Velsor; Engineers: Acting-Second Assistants, Samuel Weaver and Park Scanlan; Acting-Third-Assistants, Nathan Spear and N. J. Brooks. Volunteer--Fourth-rate. Acting-Ensigns, M. R. Haines and Louis Kenny; Acting-Master's Mates, J. A. Coleman and M. L. Kirk; Engineers: Acting-First-Assistants, Peter Wagner and G. W. Taylor; Acting-Second-Assistant, R. A. Benneson; Acting-Third-Assistant, Wm. T. Moore. Samson--Fourth-rate. Acting Ensign, Geo.W. Painter; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, H. A. Mitchell. Engineers: Acting-Chief, C. H. Christopher; Acting-First-Assistant, Wm. Paul, Jr. General Pillow--Fourth-rate. Acting-Ensign, Frank W. Halsted; Acting-Master's Mates, Geo B. Hall, B. F. Craig and W. H. Dobell; Engineers: Acting-Third-Assistants, J. T. Slack and W. H. Cornell. New national--Fourth-rate. Acting-Ensign, J. M. Farmer; Acting-Master's Mates, J. D. Holmes, W. B. Floyd W. E. Jelley and H. A. Taylor; Acting-Assistan
ir, Montgomery, in Lincoln's Cabinet, 428. Blakey, Geo. D., in Chicago Convention, 321. Blue Mills Landinhe cutter McClellan to the Rebels, 413. Briggs, Gov. Geo. N., of Mass., 106; appoints Samuel Hoar as Commitin, Gov. Andrew G., of Pa., elected, 326. Curtis, Geo.W., suppressed at Philadelphia, 367. Curtis, Judgelina, 178 to 185; his official report, 185. Hodge, Geo. B., of Ky., in Rebel Congress, 617. Hollins, Commson, Bradley T., dispatch from Kane, 465. Johnson, Geo. W., flees from Kentucky to the Confederacy, 614; cho 626. McClarty, Mr., of Ky., 492. McClellan, Gen. Geo. B., 496; his Address to the West Virginians, 520 Pryor; Roger A., visits Fort Sumter, 448. Pugh, Geo. E., of Ohio, at Charleston, 322. Punta Arenas, suesolves in the Dem. Convention, 310; 312. Sanders, Geo. N., of Ky., joins the Rebels, 342. Sandusky, OhioCol. A. M., wounded at Bull Run, 545. Woodward, Judge Geo. W., speech at the Philadelphia Peace meeting, 36
in the course of the afternoon. Here a halt of two and a half hours was taken, to rest and refresh; our rear-guard leaving that town at 7 P. M., and reaching the Potomac, opposite Williamsport, 12 miles farther, in the course of the evening. Gen. Geo. II. Stewart, with the Rebel cavalry, pursued so far as Martinsburg; but Jackson halted his infantry not far beyond Winchester; though he sent a brigade, three days later, May 28. to Charlestown, driving out a small Union force which held thhe 2d and 6th Virginia cavalry, Gen. Turner Ashby, who that day repulsed a spirited charge of our cavalry in advance, capturing Col. Percy Wyndham and 63 men. Being still sharply pressed, Ashby called for an infantry support; when the brigade of Gen. Geo. II. Stewart was promptly ordered up, and was soon hotly engaged with the Pennsylvania Bucktails, whose commander, Lt.-Col. Kane, was wounded and taken prisoner. The Rebel loss in this affair was numerically less than ours, being but 20 killed
d around Bowling Green, whence it could advance only so fast as the repair of its sole line of supply should be perfected. Its designation had been clanged to Fourteenth army corps ; the Department having been curtailed, and rechristened that of the Cumberland. It was now organized into three grand divisions: the Right, under Maj.-Gen. McCook, with Brig.-Gens. J. W. Sill, Phil. H. Sheridan, and Col. W. E. Woodruff at the head of its subordinate divisions respectively; the Center, under Maj.-Gen. Geo. II. Thomas, with its subordinate divisions led by Maj.-Gen. L. H. Rousseau, Brig.-Gens. Negley, Palmer, Dumont, and Fry; whereof Dumont and Fry were soon reliever, and Palmer transferred to the Left Wing, of which Maj.-Gen. T. L. Crittenden had command, and which consisted of the sub-divisions of Brig.-Gens. T. J. Wood, II. P. Van Cleve, and W. S. Smith. Rosecrans assigned the chief command of his dilapidated cavalry to Maj.-Gen. D. S. Stanley ; while Lt.-Col. Julius P. Garesche--an o
king 200 prisoners. Our loss here in killed and wounded was 200; that of the Rebels was estimated by our officers at 500. Marmaduke soon approaching with renforcements for Shelby, Carr fell back on Clarendon, 20 miles below Duvall's bluff, where he also was reenforced; when the enemy retreated southward. There were, of course, a good many partisan encounters and raids during the Summer; in one of which a Union scouting party, under Capt. Jug, dashed July 25. into Benton and killed Brig.-Gen. Geo. M Holt; in another, Col. W. S. Brooks 56th U. S. colored, moving out from Helena with 400 men, was attacked July 26. on Big creek by Gen. Dobbins, with a superior Rebel force, and would have been worsted, had not Maj. Carmichael, who was on a steamboat going down the Mississippi, with 150 of the 15th Illinois cavalry, heard the persistent cannon-firing and resolved to investigate the matter. Brooks had held his ground stubbornly for hours, but gained no advantage; and Dobbins was j
t in vain, to have seized and detained at the outset by the British Government. Escaping from Liverpool under the name of Oreto, she was twice seized at Nassau, but to no purpose: that island being the focus of blockade-running, and, of course, violently sympathetic with the Rebellion — as was, in fact, nearly every officer in the British naval or military service. Released from duress, she put to sea, and soon appeared as a British ship of war off the harbor of Mobile, then blockaded by Com'r Geo. II. Preble, who hesitated to fire on her lest she should be what she seemed; and in a few minutes she had passed him, and run up to Mobile, showing herself the Rebel corsair she actually was. Preble was promptly dismissed from the service — an act of justice which needed but a few repetitions to have prevented such mistakes in future. Running out Dec. 27, 1862. again under cover of darkness, the Oreto, now commanded by John N. Maffitt, Of Texas: son of a once noted Methodist clerg
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