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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 156 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 48 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 46 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 23 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 17 17 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 15 3 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 14 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 12 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Geo or search for Geo in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 3 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 4: (search)
many respects suit you remarkably well. There is a regularity, evenness, and calmness, which are fitted to one who was almost made to be a hermit, and, at the same time, a freedom which is absolutely necessary to one who never was and never will be quite patient under family government. All that is wanting is a few friends and a little more variety. . . . Remember me to your brother William, and to my old master, and don't let your sister Susan's children forget me. Yours affectionately, Geo. T. To E. Ticknor. Gottingen, December 17, 1815. . . . . No change has taken place in my condition or circumstances, dear father, since I wrote last. The only thing which has happened, which does not happen every day, is, that Everett and myself have been taken into the only club in Gottingen, and, of course, you will expect some account of it. Its name is The Literary Club, and, like all literary clubs that ever survived the frosts of the first winter, its chief occupation is to eat
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 5: (search)
sets behind the Brookline hills? We have a sunset here, too, and I never see it without thinking how often we have admired it together from the Mall. Farewell, Geo. T. To Dr. Walter Channing. GoTtingen, May 17, 1816. . . . . You ask me a great many questions about Blumenbach, and I imagine you have received anticipated , and local situation of Germany, you will easily see its most important tendencies, and conjecture many of its coming effects. . . . . Always your affectionate, Geo. T. To Elisha Ticknor. Gottingen, July 6, 1816. . . . . I know not, dear father, that I can say anything more welcome to you than that my studies of all ki such a salutation from such a distance; as little George said, mine were the farthest and longest kisses he ever had. I must hasten to close my letter. All well. Geo. T. Journal. Gottingen, September 12, 1816.—Within the last three days, I have seen a good deal of Wolf, the corypheus of German philologists, who is here on
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 9: (search)
inisters, to the Pope's Nuncio from Consalvi, the Pope's Prime Minister, to the Secretaries of the three Royal Academies, etc.; and Mr. Erving, our Minister, has received me with very remarkable kindness. A week hence you shall know more. . . . . Geo. T. To Elisha Ticknor. Madrid, June 3, 1818. On my arrival here, on the 23d ultimo, my dear father and mother, I immediately wrote to tell you of my safety . . . . . And now I can tell you that I am as comfortably settled as I have been anyst completely distinct from the diplomatic, and is to be found only in late evening parties, called tertulias, which all the principal people have every night, and to which Mr. Erving can introduce me better than anybody else. . . . . Farewell. Geo. T. To Mrs. Walter Channing. Madrid, July 25, 1818. . . . . Spain and the Spanish people amuse me more than anything I have met in Europe. There is more national character here, more originality and poetry in the popular manners and feelin