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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 156 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 5, 13th edition. 48 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 46 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 23 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 17 17 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 15 3 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition. 14 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 12 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition.. You can also browse the collection for Geo or search for Geo in all documents.

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ll granting duties in America on glass, red and white lead, painter's colors and paper, and three pence a pound on tea, declared an American revenue expedient. 7 Geo. III. c. XLVI. By another Act 7 Geo. III. c. XLI. a July. Board of Customs was established at Boston; and general Writs of Assistance were legalized. For NewGeo. III. c. XLI. a July. Board of Customs was established at Boston; and general Writs of Assistance were legalized. For New-York the Lords of Trade, avowedly from political reasons, refused to the Presbyterians any immunities, but such as might be derived from the British Law of Toleration; Report of the Board of Trade, 10 July, 1767. while an Act of Parliament Garth, 17 May, 1767; 7 Geo. III. chap. LVI. suspended the functions of its RepresentaGeo. III. chap. LVI. suspended the functions of its Representatives, till they should render obedience to the Imperial Legislature. On such an alternative, it was thought that that Province would submit without delay; and that the Americans, as their tea would now come to them at Chap. XXIX} 1767. July. a less price than to the consumers in England, would pay the impost in their own port
Account, New s Gaol, Dec. 22, 2770, in New-York Gazette of 24 Dec. 1770, and in Boston Gazette, No. 822. in prison during their session; at the same time, adopting the nomination made by Schuyler a year before, Journals of N. Y. Assembly for 10 Geo. III. pp. 44, 51, and 59. they unanimously elected Edmund Burke, for whom his own country had no employment, their Agent in England, allowing for his services at the rate of five hundred pounds per annum. Journals 11 Geo. III. p. 18. This mGeo. III. p. 18. This moderation might have persuaded the Ministry to conciliatory measures; it only raised a hope of producing divisions in America, by setting one Province against another. I can find bones to throw among them, to continue contention and prevent a renewal of their union, Hutchinson to Mauduit, Boston, Dec. 1770; H. C. III. 68, 69, 70. promised Hutchinson, now happy in the assurance of receiving from the tax on tea a salary of fifteen hundred pounds for himself as Governor, while three hundred mo
ropean Nation, and that men will always go to the cheapest market. Charles Garth to the Committee of Correspondence of South Carolina, London, 4 May, 1773. The Ministry was still in its halcyon days; no opposition was made even by the Whigs; and the mea- May. sure which was the King's own, B. Franklin to William Franklin, 14 July, 1773; Compare Anecdotes of Chatham, II. 240, 241, 242. and was designed to put America to the test, took effect as a law from the tenth day of May. 13 Geo. III. Chap. XLIV. It was immediately followed by a most carefully prepared answer from the King to Petitions from Massachusetts, announcing that he considered his authority to make laws in Parliament of sufficient force and validity to bind his subjects in America in all cases whatsoever, as essential to the dignity of the Crown, and a right appertaining to the State, which it was his duty to preserve entire and inviolate; that he, therefore, could not but be greatly displeased with the Peti
Wedderburn parted; the one to spread the celestial fire of freedom among men; to make his name a cherished household word in every Chap. LI.} 1774. Jan. nation of Europe; and in the beautiful language of Washington, to be venerated for benevolence, to be admired for talents, to be esteemed for patriotism, to be beloved for philanthropy; the other childless, though twice wedded, unbeloved, wrangling with the patron who had impeached his veracity, busy only in getting every thing he could Geo. III. in Campbell. in the way of titles and riches, as the wages of corruption Franklin when he died, had nations for his mourners, and the great and the good throughout the world as his eulogists; when Wedderburn died, there was no man to mourn; no senate spoke his praise; no poet embalmed his memory; and his King, hearing that he was certainly dead, said only, He has not left a greater knave behind him in my dominions. Brougham on Loughborough. The report of the Lords which had been pre