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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 34 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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ike the river at Isham's Ford, eight miles above the railroad bridge. Headquarters moved out in advance, and riding at a rapid pace, with an old man, a resident of the country, as a guide, we emerged suddenly from the thick forest out upon the brink of the river bluffs. There lay the Chattahoochee, about one hundred and fifty feet below us, muddy and rapid from recent rains — in every respect an unclassical stream. Right here lives William Ulrich, said to be a good Union men, and a Pennsylvania German, whose honest heart was greatly delighted, perhaps, and perhaps not, at our sudden advent. Immediately the glasses of the Signal Corps were levelled at the opposite bank, but not a discovery could they make except a solitary man wandering in the bushes. Moving a little further down the bluff, a close reconnoissance with the glasses discovered on top of the opposite hill, just in the edge of a newly-harvested wheat-field, a single twelve-pound brass howitzer, with a few gunners walki
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
austible satisfaction in the German legends in German-English and in the appendices treating of the e many dialect writers. The verbal humours of German-American speech were further exhibited, howeve to borrow lessons from European, particularly German, experience was thoroughly in evidence. Onegue, with its list of Latin, Italian, Spanish, German, and Dutch works gives eloquent testimony to tlect literature. The so-called Pennsylvania German (or Dutch) dialect is a speech-form based uponenth century practically ceased. Pennsylvania German, being isolated, had an independent growth, whdoor, Close by my father's home. In Pennsylvania German: Heit is's 'xactly zwanzig Johr, Dating they receive a renewed charm. The Pennsylvania German dialect literature is undoubtedly the midely-read Reminiscences were first written in German, but whose speeches (with many exceptions), reon abounding in Talmudical Hebrew and spurious German, it had no programme, no spiritual physiognomy[7 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.60 (search)
e 18th.—My company on picket, and I am officer of the day. Nothing of the enemy. June 19th.—The company was ordered to Waynesborough, Pa., to capture horses and cattle in the neighborhood for our army. A powerful thunder-storm surprised us at night, and we took refuge on a large farm. The proprietor was obliged to furnish us with rations for ourselves and our horses. June 20th.—We succeeded in capturing a number of horses and some cattle. At noon we came to the farm of an old Pennsylvania German. He was scared to death at catching sight of us, and shouted O mein Gott, die rebels! I soon reassured him, telling him that no harm should result to him if he furnished us with a dinner and rations for our horses, and we were well cared for. A Federal cavalry regiment passed in sight of the place, fortunately not discovering our presence, and I concluded to march with my command to Lestersburg, Md., where the citizens furnished us with supper. We camped for the night in an open fi<