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George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 738 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 52 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 26 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 22 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 18 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 16 0 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 16 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 14 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. You can also browse the collection for German or search for German in all documents.

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e their light and heavy infantry and cavalry, their rifles, and every branch of the service well represented, each having its particular part to play in skirmish or battle; but owing to our hurry in forming the Southern army, and the continual succession of stirring events, we have but three classes-artillery, infantry, and cavalry-without further distinctions; and one regiment is considered as heavy as another if it musters only five hundred men. The enemy have splendid bands, for there are German, Dutch, Italians, and French in their ranks by tens of thousands. Not so with us. The ruling foreign element with us is Irish, and, although Irishmen are passionately fond of music, they still cling to the musket, and make music of their own in the hour of battle. I wish we had a hundred thousand of them; they make the best soldiers in the world. We have some good bands in the service, Major, though I confess but few of them. The Louisiana bands are occasionally good, and that of the