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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 210 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 64 8 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 60 4 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 26 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 25 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 18 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 16 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 6 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for George W. Getty or search for George W. Getty in all documents.

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eded to be covered and protected in that direction only. The enemy made no effort to attack us while we were moving the trains that day, and the wagons were all safely parked for the night on the south side of the Chickahominy, guarded by General Getty, who had relieved Abercrombie from command of the infantry fragments before we started off from the White House. To secure the crossing at Jones's bridge, Torbert had pushed Devin's brigade out on the Long Bridge road, on the side of the Chickahominy where, on the morning of the 23d, he was attacked by Chambliss's brigade of W. H. F. Lee's division. Devin was driven in some little distance, but being reinforced by Getty with six companies of colored troops, he quickly turned the tables on Chambliss and re-established his picket-posts. From this affair I learned that Chambliss's brigade was the advance of the Confederate cavalry corps, while Hampton discovered from it that we were already in possession of the Jones's bridge cr
nfantry force comprised the Sixth Corps, one division of the Nineteenth Corps, and two divisions from West Virginia. The Sixth Corps was commanded by Major-General Horatio G. Wright; its three divisions by BrigadierGenerals David A. Russell, Geo. W. Getty, and James B. Ricketts. The single division of the Nineteenth Corps had for its immediate chief Brigadier-General William Dwight, the corps being commanded by Brigadier-General Wm. H. Emory. The troops from West Virginia were under Brigadiession, but my assignment by the President to the command of the army in the valley met with Wright's approbation, and, so far as I have ever known, he never questioned the propriety of the President's action. The Sixth Corps division commanders, Getty, Russell, and Ricketts, were all educated soldiers, whose records, beginning with the Mexican War, had already been illustrated in the war of the rebellion by distinguished service in the Army of the Potomac. General Emory was a veteran, havi
eding Miss Wright's communication the infantry was quiet, with the exception of Getty's division, which made a reconnoissance to the Opequon, and developed a heavy fWisconsin (battalion), Major Charles W. Kempf. Second division: Brigadier-General George W. Getty. first brigade: Brigadier-General Frank Wheaton. Sixty-second ur. When the two corps had all got through the cafion they were formed with Getty's division of the Sixth to the left of the Berryville pike, Rickett's division he time Wright and Emory were ready to attack. Just before noon the line of Getty, Ricketts, and Grover moved forward, and as we advanced, the Confederates, coveivisions of his army in a connected line of battle in good shape to resist. Getty and Ricketts made some progress toward Winchester in connection with Wilson's cavalry, which was beyond the Senseny road on Getty's left, and as they were pressing back Ramseur's infantry and Lomax's cavalry Grover attacked from the right with
tle. The execution of this plan would require perfect secrecy, however, for the enemy from his signal station on Three Top could plainly see every movement of our troops in daylight. Hence, to escape such observation, I marched Crook during the night of the 20th into some heavy timber north of Cedar Creek, where he lay concealed all day the 21st. This same day Wright and Emory were moved up closer to the Confederate works, and the Sixth Corps, after a severe fight, in which Ricketts's and Getty were engaged, took up some high ground on the right of the Manassas Gap railroad in plain view of the Confederate works, and confronting a commanding point where much of Early's artillery was massed. Soon after General Wright had established this line I rode with him along it to the westward, and finding that the enemy was still holding an elevated position further to our right, on the north side of Tumbling Run, I directed this also to be occupied. Wright soon carried the point, which gav
r-General James B. Ricketts. (2) Brigadier-General George W. Getty. (3) Major-General Horatio G. Wrt of it, and a little later came up in rear of Getty's division of the Sixth Corps. When I arrivedittle narrow valley, or depression, in rear of Getty's line, and dismounting on the opposite crest,ought to the front, so they could be formed on Getty's division, prolonged to the right; for I had they had been halted to the right and rear of Getty. After this conversation I rode to the east of the Valley pike and to the left of Getty's division, to a point from which I could obtain a goquick to the front, while I turned back toward Getty's line to point out where these returning trooight to resume command of the Sixth Corps, and Getty, who was temporarily in charge of it, to take by Emory, however, and as the enemy fell back Getty's troops were returned to their original placee said that no systematic stand was made until Getty's division, aided by Torbert's cavalry, which [9 more...]<
coming up all hot and out of breath, promptly formed on Seymour's left. Both divisions thus aligned faced southwest toward Sailor's Creek, and the artillery of the corps being massed to the left and front of the Hibbon house, without waiting for Getty's division-for I feared that if we delayed longer the enemy might effect his escape toward Farmville — the general attack was begun. Seymour and Wheaton, moving forward together, assailed the enemy's front and left, and Stagg's brigade, too, whsed him vigorously, gaining ground at all points except just to the right of the road, where Seymour's left was checked. Here the confederates burst back on us in a countercharge, surging down almost to the creek, but the artillery, supported by Getty, who in the mean time had come on the ground, opened on them so terribly that this audacious and furious onset was completely broken, though the gallant fellows fell back to their original line doggedly, and not until after they had almost gained