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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 210 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 64 8 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 60 4 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 26 0 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 25 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 18 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 16 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 6 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for George W. Getty or search for George W. Getty in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., From the Wilderness to Cold Harbor. (search)
well became engaged on the Old turnpike, A. P. Hill's advance struck the Federal outposts on the Plank road at Parker's store, on the outskirts of the Wilderness. These were driven in and followed up to their line of battle, which was so posted as to cover the junction of the Plank Brevet Major-General Alexander S. Webb, wounded at Spotsylvania. From a photograph. road with the Stevensburg and Brock roads, on which the Federal army was moving toward Spotsylvania. The fight began between Getty's division of the Sixth Corps and Heth's division, which was leading A. P. Hill's column. Hancock's corps, which was already on the march for Spotsylvania. by way of Chancellorsville, was at once recalled, and at 4 o'clock in the afternoon was ordered to drive Hill out of the Wilderness. Cadmus Wilcox's division went to Heth's support, and Poague's battalion of artillery took position in a little clearing on the north side of the Plank road, in rear of the Confederate infantry. But there
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Through the Wilderness. (search)
with Wright's division and Neill's brigade of Getty's division, was ordered to move out, west of tat Hill was coming down the Orange Plank road, Getty was directed to move out toward him, by way of the junction of the Plank and Germanna roads. Getty's division was then in line of battle, along tintrenching. This was at 2 P. M. of the 5th. Getty informed Hancock that there were two divisionsancock placed Birney's division on the left of Getty, in two lines of battle along the Brock road, ia Artillery was posted with the troops of General Getty.--editors. Frank's brigade of Barlow's divgs and earth, the intrenched line beginning at Getty's left and extending to Barlow's left, where i Mott nearest the Plank road. At 4:30 P. M. Getty started to the attack, and marched but four huk threw forward Birney and Mott on the left of Getty, and put a section of Ricketts's old battery o Gibbon's division) was ordered to relieve General Getty. When I advanced I immediately became eng[6 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at the beginning of Grant's campaign against Richmond. (search)
-Col. Egbert Olcott; 95th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Edward Carroll; 96th Pa., Lieut.-Col. William H. Lessig. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. David A. Russell: 6th Me., Maj. George Fuller; 49th Pa., Col. Thomas M. Hulings; 119th Pa., Maj. Henry P. Truefitt, Jr.; 5th Wis., Lieut.-Col. Theodore B. Catlin. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Alexander Shaler: 65th N. Y., Col. Joseph E. Hamblin; 67th N. Y., Col. Nelson Cross; 122d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Augustus W. Dwight; 82d Pa. (detachment). Second division, Brig.-Gen. George W. Getty. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Frank Wheaton: 62d N. Y., Col. David J. Nevin; 93d Pa., Lieut.-Col. John S. Long; 98th Pa., Col. John F. Ballier; 102d Pa., Col. John W. Patterson; 139th Pa., Lieut.-Col. William H. Moody. Second Brigade, Col. Lewis A. Grant: 2d Vt., Col. Newton Stone; 3d Vt., Col. Thomas O. Seaver; 4th Vt., Col. George P. Foster; 5th Vt., Lieut.-Col. John R. Lewis; 6th Vt., Col. Elisha L. Barney. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Thomas H. Neill: 7th Me., Col. Edwin C. Mason; 4
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan's Trevilian raid. (search)
it impracticable to carry out his orders in the presence of Hampton. On the 18th of June Sheridan learned that supplies awaited him at White House; which depot he was ordered to break up, transferring its contents to the new base. On the 19th the column crossed the Mattapony at Dunkirk, and on the 20th its commander learned that White House was threatened by the enemy. It was guarded by a small detachment, made up of invalids, dismounted cavalry, and colored infantry, commanded by General Getty, who was en route to join his permanent command. Sheridan moved leisurely to the spot, found the enemy on the bluffs overlooking the depot, and drove them away. Having made all preparations on the 24th, Sheridan took up the line of march for Petersburg, with his valuable charge of nine hundred wagons. The enemy, foiled at White House, were in an ugly mood. On this day Torbert was in front; Gregg was on the flank, where he was marching parallel with the train when he was attacked, at
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
ome time with a loss to the Sixth Corps, principally Getty's division, of 260 killed and wounded. In the meanti. The infantry followed — Wright's corps first, with Getty leading, and Emory next. Between two and three mile parade. General Merritt informed Colonel Warner of Getty's division, near which the cavalry passed, and whichosition and fight, and Warner promised to notify General Getty, and no doubt did so, for that division of the She west of it, and a little later came up in rear of Getty's division of the Sixth Corps. When I arrived, thisrecognition. . . . I then turned back to the rear of Getty's division, and as I came behind it a line of regimewithstood the panic, had formed behind the troops of Getty. The line with the colors was largely composed of o the little narrow valley, or depression, in rear of Getty's line, and, dismounting on the opposite crest, estaouble-quick to the front, while I turned back toward Getty's line to point out where these returning troops sho
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864. (search)
rmy Corps, Brig.-Gen. James B. Ricketts (w), This roster may be incomplete as regards the indication of officers who were killed (k) or wounded (w). Brig.-Gen. George W. Getty, Maj.-Gen. Horatio G. Wright. Commanded the army during General Sheridan's temporary absence in the early part of the battle. Staff loss: w, 2. Edeon Clark; 2d R. I. (batt'n), Capt. Elisha H. Rhodes; 5th Wis. (batt'n), Maj. Charles W. Kempf; 17th Pa. Cavalry, Maj. Coe Durland. Second division, Brig.-Gen. George W. Getty, Brig.-Gen. Lewis A. Grant, Brig.-Gen. George W. Getty. First Brigade, Col. James M. Warner: 62d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Theodore B. Hamilton; 93d Pa., CaptBrig.-Gen. George W. Getty. First Brigade, Col. James M. Warner: 62d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Theodore B. Hamilton; 93d Pa., Capt. David C. Keller; 98th Pa., Lieut.-Col. John B. Kohler, Capt. Gottfried Bauer; 102d Pa., Maj. James H. Coleman, Capt. James Patchell; 139th Pa., Lieut.-Col. John G. Parr. Brigade loss: k, 36; w, 189; m, 4=229. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Lewis A. Grant, Lieut.-Col. Amasa S. Tracy, Brig.-Gen. Lewis A. Grant: 2d Vt., Lieut.-Col. Ama
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Operations South of the James River. (search)
fense, after repeated unsuccessful attempts on our lines, in all of which he was signally repulsed, he sat down before it and commenced an investment according to the most improved principles of military science. The chief engagements during the siege were an attack, April 14th, by the Confederate land batteries on the gunboats in the Nansemond, and the capture, April 19th, of Battery Huger, at the mouth of the West Branch, by a combined force from the Union army and navy, under General George W. Getty and Lieutenant B. H. Lamson, commanding the flotilla in the upper Nansemond. The force under General Longstreet at the time of the closest investment numbered 20,000. March 31st, General Peek had 15,000, and April 30th nearly 25,000.--editors. As first organized it was arranged as follows: First Brigade, 3d New York, and 1st District of Columbia Cavalry, Colonel S. H. Mix commanding. Second Brigade, 11th and 5th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Colonel S. P. Spear commanding. A section of
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Petersburg and Richmond: December 31st, 1864. (search)
e, Brig.-Gen. Ranald S. Mackenzie: 2d Conn. Heavy Art'y, Lieut.-Col. James Hubbard; 65th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Henry C. Fisk; 121st N. Y., Capt. James W. Cronkite; 95th Pa. (6 co's), Maj. John Harper. Third Brigade, Col. Thomas S. Allen: 37th Mass., Maj. Rufus P. Lincoln; 49th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Baynton J. Hickman; 82d Pa., Lieut.-Col. James R. Neiler; 119th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Gideon Clark; 2d R. I. (6 co's), Capt. Elisha H. Rhodes; 5th Wis., Lieut.-Col. James M. Bull. Second division, Brig.-Gen. George W. Getty (on leave), Brig.-Gen. Lewis A. Grant. First Brigade, Col. James M. Warner (on leave), Col. George P. Foster: 62d N. Y., Maj. William H. Baker; 93d Pa., Lieut.-Col. Charles W. Eckman; 98th Pa., Capt. Peter Beisel; 102d Pa., Lieut.-Col. James Patchell; 139th Pa., Lieut.-Col. John G. Parr. Second Brigade, Lieut.-Col. Charles Hunsdon: 1st Vt. Heavy Art'y, Maj. Aldace F. Walker; 2d Vt., Maj. Enoch E. Johnson; 3d and 4th Vt., Lieut.-Col. Horace W. Floyd; 5th Vt., Capt. Ronald A. Kenn
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the James River. (search)
y reach Suffolk to attack General Peck. Admiral Lee hastily dispatched two flotillas to hold the line of the river: one composed of the Stepping Stones and seven other gun-boats under Lieutenant R. H. Lamson, in the upper Nansemond, and the other of four gun-boats under Lieutenant William B. Cushing, in the lower waters. Of special importance were the capture on the 19th of April of the battery at Hill's Point, by Lieutenant Lamson's flotilla, in conjunction with three hundred men under General Getty, and a landing expedition on the 22d to Chuckatuck, several miles inland, under Lieutenant Gushing. After several months of inaction it was decided in August, 1863, to make a reconnoissance up the James River. The force consisted of the monitor Sangamon, the ferry-boat Commodore Barney, and the small steamer Cohasset, all under the command of Captain G. Gansevoort. General Foster accompanied the squadron in an army tug-boat, but afterward went on board the Sangamon. The expedition s
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Five Forks and the pursuit of Lee. (search)
of the heights on which General Ewell had rested the divisions of his army, ready for an attack if made, and with the hope that under cover of night the whole Confederate army might escape in safety to Danville. The pursuing troops were halted on tile face of the hills skirting the valley, within the range of the enemy's guns, and lines were adjusted for an assault. Artillery was put in position on these hills, and a heavy fire was immediately opened. An effort was made to get up General G. W. Getty's division of the Sixth Corps, and a portion of the Second Brigade of the Third Division, which had been dispatched to attack a battery on the right, but the day was too far spent to await their arrival. After a few moments' delay, General Wright, as directed by General Sheridan, ordered an immediate assault to be made, by the infantry, under tlhe cover of the artillery fire. Colonel Stagg's brigade of cavalry was, at the same time, ordered by General Sheridan to attack and, if poss
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