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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General Forrest of operations against W. Sooy Smith in February, 1864. (search)
the flank, and, if possible, to gain the enemy's rear. I ordered Colonel Neely to move his (Richardson's) brigade at once, and to guard all the ferries and fords across Tibbee river from the mouth of Line creek to Tibbee station; sending Major-General Gholson and the State forces under his commond to Palo Alto, to watch any movement of the enemy from the direction of Houston. In making these necessary dispositions, my effective force in front of the enemy was reduced to Chalmers' division, my men and horses, and losing another piece of artillery. Half of my command were out of ammunition; the men and horses exhausted and worn down with two days hard riding and fighting. Night was at hand and further pursuit impossible. Major-General Gholson arrived during the night. His command was small, but comparatively fresh. I ordered him to follow on the next morning and press them across the Tallahatchie. Having received no official report from him, I cannot give any details of his
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Forrest's operations against Smith and Grierson. (search)
unt for our small loss is, the fact that we kept so close to them that the enemy overshot our men. Owing to the broken down and exhausted condition of men and horses, and being almost out of ammunition, I was compelled to stop pursuit. Major-General Gholson arrived during Monday night, and his command being comparatively fresh, continued the pursuit, and when last heard from, was still driving the enemy, capturing horses and prisoners. The enemy had crossed the Tallahatchie river on the nigd during Monday night, and his command being comparatively fresh, continued the pursuit, and when last heard from, was still driving the enemy, capturing horses and prisoners. The enemy had crossed the Tallahatchie river on the night of the 23rd, burning the bridge behind them at New Albany, and retreating rapidly towards Memphis, with Gholson still in pursuit. I am, General, Very respectfully, your obedient servant, [Signed] N. B. Forrest, Major-General. To Lieutenant-General L. Polk.