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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 94 12 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 76 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 52 4 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 30 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 22 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 20 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 16 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 13 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Gibbon or search for Gibbon in all documents.

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this. When General Sickles moved forward his corps, on the afternoon of the second of July, from its appropriate place in the general line, he excited the astonishment of the thousands of lookers on. It was a magnificent sight, but excited the gravest apprehension, and the writer well recollects the remarks made at the time by some prominent officers. The right of his line was entirely disconnected from the Second corps, leaving an interval of from one half to one quarter of a mile. General Gibbon, commanding the Second corps, at this moment threw forward into this interval two regiments of infantry and a battery, which were nearly destroyed when the shock fell on Sickles's corps. A like interval was left between the right of the Fifth corps. and the left of the Third. In this position, with no connection on his right or left, General Sickles became engaged. Had the Second and Fifth corps been moved up to conform to this line, the battle would have been delivered in front of t