Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for John Gibbon or search for John Gibbon in all documents.

Your search returned 33 results in 8 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
order, the army was directed upon Centreville instead of upon Manassas) en-countered Jackson's forces in position as stated in the preceding note about 5:30 P. M. Gibbon's brigade, with two regiments of Doubleday's (the 56th Pennsylvania and 76th New York), contended against Taliaferro's division and two brigades (Lawton's and Trill back, yielding the field to our troops. The loss on both sides was heavy, and among our wounded were Major-General Ewell and Brigadier-General Taliaferro. Gibbon's brigade lost 133 killed, 539 wounded, 79 missing, total, 751, or considerably over one-third of the command. King held his ground until 1 A. M. on the 29th, whto the column to hasten its march, and proceeded to the left at once myself in the direction of the firing, arriving on the field just before dark, and found that Gibbon's brigade, of King's division, was engaged with tile enemy, with Doubleday's and Patrick's brigades in the vicinity. After the firing ceased I saw General King,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., In vindication of General Rufus King. (search)
that raged at sunset. King's orders were to march to Centreville, which was objected to strenuously by Stonewall Jackson's corps, and they were in the majority. The brigade commanders voted for a deflection to the right toward Manassas, General John Gibbon being most urgent, and the following extract from a letter from him to King, dated Baltimore, March 17th, 1863,gives his views: I deem it not out of place to say that that retreat was suggested and urged by myself as a necessary militaf the two courses which I considered open to you, of obeying your orders to march to Centreville or retreat on Manassas on your own responsibility, the one you adopted was the proper one. Having first suggested the movement and urged it on military grounds, I am perfectly willing to bear my full share of the responsibility, and you are at liberty to make any use of this communication you may deem proper. I am, General, very respectfully, your obedient servant, John Gibbon, Brig.-Gen. Vols.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at the Second Bull Run. August 16th-September 2d, 1862. (search)
, Col. Sullivan A. Meredith (w), Lieut.-Col. J. William Hofmann; 76th N. Y., Col. William P. Wainwright; 95th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. James B. Post. Brigade loss: k, 18; w, 192; m, 237 = 447. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Marsena R. Patrick: 21st N. Y., Col. William F. Rogers; 23d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Nirom M. Crane; 35th N. Y., Col. Newton B. Lord; 80th N. Y. (20th Militia), Col. George W. Pratt (mn w), Lieut.-Col. Theodore B. Gates. Brigade loss: k, 56; w, 334; m, 178 = 568. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John Gibbon: 2d Wis., Col. Edgar O'Connor (k), Lieut.-Col. Lucius Fairchild; 6th Wis., Col. Lysander Cutler (w), Lieut.-Col. Edward S. Bragg; 7th Wis., Col. William W. Robinson (w), Lieut.-Col. Charles A. Hamilton (w), Lieut.-Col. Lucius Fairchild; 19th Ind., Col. Solomon Meredith. Brigade loss: k, 148; w, 626; m, 120 = 894. Artillery, 1st N. H., Capt. George A. Gerrish (c), Lieut. Frederick M. Edgell; D, 1st R. I., Capt. J. Albert Monroe; L, 1st N. Y., Capt. John A. Reynolds; B, 4th U. S., Cap
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Jackson's raid around Pope. (search)
s did not advance, and it may be called a drawn battle as a tribute due by either side to the gallantry of the other. Five of Jackson's brigades took part in the conflict, Lawton's and Trimble's of Ewell's, and Starke's, Taliaferro's, and Baylor's, of Jackson's old division. Early's, Forno's, and Johnson's brigades were not engaged, nor were any of the brigades of General A. P. Hill's division. The Federal troops encountered were those of King's division, and consisted of the brigade of Gibbon and two regiments of Doubleday's brigade. In this battle the right of the Confederate line was held by Taliaferro's brigade of Virginia and Alabama troops, commanded by Colonel Alexander G. Taliaferro, 23d Virginia; next on the left was Jackson's old brigade, all Virginians (lately commanded by General C. S. Winder, killed at Slaughter's [Cedar] Mountain),--officially designated as the Stonewall, in honor of the steadiness and gallantry which it displayed on the same field [the First Bull
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of South Mountain, or Boonsboro‘ (search)
ock and lasted until after dark. Colquitt and Gibbon, in the center, joined desperately in the battcept that which went directly up the pike with Gibbon's brigade and one battery (Cooper's) on the enbetter than he did. General Hooker detached Gibbon's brigade, consisting of three Wisconsin Fof 3500 men (the number reported by Hatch after Gibbon had been detached), and fought it so vigorouslwithin a hundred yards of each other. But now Gibbon was putting in earnest work on the pike. He h hill, the slope of which is seen on the left; Gibbon was farther down the road in their hollow. Thht Gorman's brigade of Sumner's corps relieved Gibbon's. General Gibbon reports officially 318 metered brave men. From his report we infer that Gibbon had fifteen hundred men. On our side Colquitt ,--Meade, Hatch, Cox, Willcox, Scammon, Crook, Gibbon, Ewing, Gallagher, Magilton, Phelps, White, Jaenant in my company in the Mexican war. General John Gibbon (whose brigade pressed up the pike on t[2 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Forcing Fox's Gap and Turner's Gap. (search)
radually worked its way along the old Hagerstown road, crossing the heights in that direction after dark in the evening. Gibbon's brigade had advanced along the National road, crowding up quite close to Turner's Gap, and engaging the enemy under Colthe valley, connecting with Meade's left and Hatch's right, and all were directed to sleep on their arms. Brigadier-General John Gibbon reports: . . .My brigade was detached from the division and ordered to report for duty to Major-General BLate in the afternoon I was ordered to move up the Hagerstown turnpike [National road] with my brigade and one section of Gibbon's battery to attack the position of the enemy in the gorge. The 7th Wisconsin and the 19th Indiana.were placed respectiv, supported by Evans's independent brigade. Colquitt's brigade, of D. H. Hill's division, held the main turnpike against Gibbon.--Editors. On Monday morning our first duty was to bury the dead and to see that the wounded in our field-hospitals w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the Maryland campaign. (search)
95th N. Y., Maj. Edward Pye; 56th Pa., Lieut.-Col. J. William Hofmann, Capt. Frederick Williams. Brigade loss: South Mountain, k, 3; w, 52; m, 4==59. Antietam, w, 10. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Marsena R. Patrick: 21st N. Y., Col. William F. Rogers; 23d N. Y., Col. Henry C. Hoffman; 35th N. Y., Col. Newton B. Lord; 80th N. Y. (20th Militia), Lieut.-Col. Theodore B. Gates. Brigade loss: South Mountain, k, 3; w, 19; m, 1 == 23. Antietam, k, 30; w, 187; mn, 17 == 234. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John Gibbon: 19th Ind., Col. Solomon Meredith, Lieut.-Col. Alois 0. Bachman (k), Capt. William W. Dudley: 2d Wis., Col. Lucius Fairchild, Lieut.-Col. Thomas S. Allen (w); 6th Wis., Lieut.-Col. Edward S. Bragg (w), Maj. Rufus R. Dawes; 7th Wis., Capt. John B. Callis. Brigade loss: South Mountain, k, 37; w, 251; m, 30 == 318. Antietam, k, 68; w, 275; m, 5 == 348. Artillery, Capt. J. Albert Monroe: 1st N. Y., Lieut. Frederick M. Edgell; D, 1st R. I., Capt. J. Albert Monroe; L, 1st N. Y., Capt. J
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Antietam. (search)
e spot is fully identified as Poffenberger's by General Gibbon, who commanded the right brigade, and by Major to advance. Doubleday's division was in two lines, Gibbon's and Phelps's brigades in front, supported by Patrick and Hofmann. Gibbon had the right and guided upon the turnpike. Pat-rick held a small wood in his rear,wnmost extension of the West Wood, and thus to cover Gibbon's right flank as he advanced. Part of Battery B, 4th United States Artillery (Gibbon's own battery), was run forward to Miller's barn and stack-yard on the righhe farther side of which was the enemy's line. But Gibbon's right, covered by the corn, had outmarched the leWood, and now made a dash at the right flank and at Gibbon's exposed guns. His men on the right faced by thatter. Patrick's brigade had come up in support of Gibbon, and was sent across the turnpike into the West Wooe cover of a ledge at right angles to the road near Gibbon's guns. Farther to the left Phelps's and Hofmann