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achem a coate every winter while shee liveth. Mass. Coll. Rec., i. 292. This sale or conveyance to Cambridge is recognized in a deed executed Jan. 13, 1639, by the Squa-Sachem of Misticke and her husband Webcowits, whereby they conveyed to Jotham Gibbons the reversion of all that parcel of land which lies against the ponds at Mistick aforesaid, together with the said ponds, all which we reserved from Charlestown and Cambridge, late called Newtowne, and all hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging, after the death of me the said Squa-Sachem. The original deed is preserved in the files of the Middlesex County Court, 1662, having been used as evidence in a legal controversy concerning the lands conveyed to Gibbons. Besides the Indian marks, it bears the autographs of John Winthrop, John Endicott, Richard Saltonstall, Thomas Flint, Thomas Danforth, and William Aspinwall. The inhabitants of Cambridge lived on friendly terms with the Indians; at least, no evidence appears
o secure the Indians' corn (Paige, 384). This was a fence of two sufficient rails in the town line (between Cambridge and Charlestown) about half a mile in length, beginning at the outside of Cooke's land, and running out northward to meet Capt. Gibbons's fence, and enclosed the land on the west of the two great ponds, called Misticke ponds, which the Squa-Sachem reserved for her use during her life from sale of lands to the towns of Charlestown and Cambridge, for the Indians to plant and huding, in Charlestown limits, from the south side of Mr. Nowell's lot, near the upper end of the ponds, to the brook from Cooke's mill. The reversion of this Indian reservation, together with the said ponds, was conveyed by the Squa-Sachem to Jotham Gibbons. In 1662 it was possessed and improved by Thomas Gleison of Charlestown, and the inhabitants of Charlestown had proceeded to lay claim to it. See Paige, 382—84; Wymat, 203, 283, 406,411; Midd. Registry, i. 173, 4, 5, 6; II. l; &c. In 1643
Fuller, 229, 261, 262 Gage, 62, 64, 59, 69, 74, 78, 80, 81, 111, 161, 297 Gallagher, 346 Gallop, 261 Galvin, 179 Gammon, 349 Gannett, 104, 118 Gardner, 12, 13, 24, 38, 68, 94, 100, 118-20, 130, 131, 137, 140, 141, 143, 170-72, 178, 187, 194, 196, 204, 206, 208, 215, 251, 252, 270, 274, 308, 334, 344, 346 Garfield, 193, 262 Gasset, 164 Gates, 22, 166, 351 Gay, 32, 218, 262, 340 Gee, 24 Geier, 343 Geohagan, 262, 310, 326 Gerry, 69, 60, 190, 262 Gibbons, 6, 7 Gibbs, 172, 177, 343 Gibson, 166, 215, 252,348 Gilbert, 252, 310 Gilceas, 346 Gill, 44 Gilmore, 262, 309 Gilson, 219, 262 Gladdeus, 252 Glazier, 262, 263 Gleason, 218, 252 Gleison, 7 Goddard, 233, 252, 309 Goddin and Godding, 11, 12, 22, 262, 263, 299, 301, 328 Goffe, 7 Goldsmith, 262, 263 Goldthwait, 67 Goodwin, 173, 184, 222, 262, 263 Gookin, 253, 275 Gordon, 53, 61, 63, 64, 65, 78 Gore, 13 Gorton, 7 Goss, 253 Goul
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 24., The Indians of the Mystic valley and the litigation over their land. (search)
In 1636 a deed is recorded granting a tract of land to Jotham Gibbons of Boston as follows: Middlesex Deeds, B. I, P. 174s at Misticke; with the said ponds I do give freely to Jotham Gibbons his Heyres Executors and Assignes forever not willing up any part of that Tract of Land that was given unto Jotham Gibbons by the Squaw Sachem, neither doe I think that it was af November, 1639, the squa sachem gave another deed to Jotham Gibbons for the same tract of land as follows: Middx. er part thereof to the defendant as land belonging to Jotham Gibbons and for the defendant costs six shillings and two pencthe possession of said Gleason given by Squa Sachem to Jotham Gibbons The Court in a hearing of the Case and All persons lessly lost. From the expression in the first deed to Jotham Gibbons in 1636, which I reserved from Charlestowne and Cambriecision to give one-quarter only of the reservation to Jotham Gibbons, grantee, is absolutely incomprehensible. The deed is