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Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life 24 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 16 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 16 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 5 1 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for James S. Gibbons or search for James S. Gibbons in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
51. transfer that was certainly very dishonorable, and wholly unworthy of the character of those who participated in it. Gerrit Smith says the transfer of the Emancipator was a great outrage—told Burleigh so—not publicly (Ms. Feb. 10, 1841, J. S. Gibbons to W. L. G.). The transfer of the Emancipator was indefensible (Ms. Nov. 26, 1870, Gerrit Smith to W. L. G.). Yet I doubt not that the mission of J. A. C. will do much for our persecuted Collins. enterprise. For what you have done to aid, 1841, and it was arranged that both names should appear in the paper, but that Mrs. Child should have immediate charge, removing to New York, while her husband remained on his beet-sugar farm near Northampton, Mass. (Ms. Mar. 30, 31, 1841, J. S. Gibbons to W. L. G.). Rogers in July began to urge his very brother to make the Ms. July 16, 1841, Rogers to W. L. G. trip in question, then far from fashionable or well-known, or well-provided with houses of entertainment. Forgive me for writing s
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
rise, deep mortification, and extreme regret, a circular addressed to the press of New-York by the Executive Committee of the American Society, and signed by James S. Gibbons and Lydia Maria Child. They regretted that the Liberator articles on disunion Lib. 12.71. had been so construed as to commit the Society, in the public vieealth. A little later she Lib. 12.57. repeated her own readiness for the doctrine, though she deprecated making a test question of it, as did J. S. Lib. 12.73. Gibbons. With characteristic delicacy, Mr. Garrison decided to absent himself (for the first time) from the anniversary of the American Society. Public announcement oparty paper called the Madison County Abolitionist. Gerrit Smith had invited him to edit it, and contributed to his support (Lib. 11: 159; Mss. Sept. 29, 1841, J. S. Gibbons to W. L. G., and Oct. 9, 1841, J. C. Jackson to Abby Kelley). Just before Mr. Garrison's arrival, Jackson had publicly advertised a Liberty Party lecturing par
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 3: the covenant with death.1843. (search)
iles in their own wagons to attend it, at an Lib. 13.81. inconceivably small expense. This was the first year since the secession that we were fairly wheeled into line of battle against slavery proper. . . . The principal business of the meeting was to decide what was best to be done with the American Society. Some were for disbanding it, as a machine costing more than it was worth. More were for removing it to Boston, on the ground that there was literally nobody in New York but James S. Gibbons who either would or could act as a member of the Executive Committee. To prevent the scandal of a discussion of these topics before the pro-slavery reporters and the miscellaneous audiences we usually had, we referred all the business of the Society to a Committee of 25, to be arranged and in fact done by them. In this Committee the question of the removal to Boston was urged vehemently by Garrison, Collins, Foster, Abby Kelley, and others, and was apparently well received by all th
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
emperance, as lecturer and journalist (Lib. 27: 92). etc., from the cause East; Arnold Buffum, from the West; Thomas Earle, with C. C. Burleigh and J. M. McKim, editors of the Pennsylvania Freeman, and Thomas S. Cavender of Philadelphia; and James S. Gibbons of New York. Mr. Child, in accordance with a notice already given, withdrew from the editorship of the Standard, and was replaced by a committee of three, consisting of Sydney Howard Gay, Wendell Phillips wrote to Elizabeth Pease in Octot puts the Slaveholder in his true place as the Disunionist; it exposes to the world that the only actual disturbing element in our Union is our injustice to our colored brethren. They have Protest of D. L. Child, E. G. Loring, J. Southwick, J. S. Gibbons, etc. made a covenant with death —that covenant they can abrogate. With hell they are at agreement —from it they can withdraw their countenance. The proposition may be, and really is, impracticable to those who feel unwilling or unable to s