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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 14 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 10 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 5 3 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 4 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 9, 1865., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 9: the last review. (search)
aughtsman, getting ready to illustrate Seward's diplomatic message to Napoleon that a French army cannot force an Austrian Emperor on the Mexican Republic. Crook, so familiar to our army, is not here, preferring an engagement elsewhere and otherwise; for love, too, bears honors to-day. Soldierly Merritt is at the head, well deserving of his place. Leading the divisions are Custer, Davies, and Devin, names known before and since in the lists of heroes. Following also, others whom we know: Gibbs, Wells, Pennington, Stagg of Michigan, Fitzhugh of New York, Brayton Ives of Connecticut. Dashing Kilpatrick is far away. Grand Gregg we do not see; nor level-headed Smith, nor indomitable Prin. Cilley, with his 1st Maine Cavalry; these now sent to complete the peace around Petersburg. Now rides the provost marshal general, gallant George Macy of the 20th Massachusetts, his right arm symbolized by an empty sleeve pinned across his breast. Here the 2d Pennsylvania Cavalry, and sto
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 63 (search)
e highest qualities of the patriot soldier. To Maj. L. M. Strong and Adjt. D. R. Cook my thanks are especially due for their gallantry and very valuable assistance rendered me throughout the campaign. Major Strong was severely wounded in the battle of the 27th of May,. but declined to leave the field and remained on duty and witnessed the crowning success of the campaign. I feel entirely incompetent to pronounce eulogy upon the heroic dead. The memory of Lieutenants Simons, Ramsey, Gibbs, Wallace, and the many brave men who with them have so nobly died, should ever be cherished in the hearts of our people and inspire there, as in the minds of theiF remaining comrades, the determination to defend and forever establish the great cause in defense of which their blood was shed — the hope of humanity, our free institutions — a fitting monument to the glorious sacrifice. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Saml. F. Gray, Lieut. Col., Comdg. Forty-ninth Ohio Vet. Vols.
orders. With the remainder of my command I pressed on to Woodson's Gap, 6 miles beyond Fincastle, where I detached Lieutenant Gibbs, of my company, with 10 men, to guard the road coming into Woodson's Gap from the direction of Clinch River. I thened forward with the remnant of my command to watch some passes a few miles above. In a short time a courier from Lieutenant Gibbs informed me that he had captured the advance guard of the tories, when I immediately changed direction and returned ad by this time come in full view, with an apparent force of from 700 to 800 men. I at once ordered Lieutenants Owens and Gibbs, of my company, to attack them in the rear with 25 men, while I charged them in front, thereby preventing their crossing nding the same number. Five members of my company were seriously wounded during the engagement; among the number Lieutenant Gibbs. Captain Bradley's company was not engaged in the fight, having been left, as stated above, at Big Creek Gap.
d; but, before they had advanced ten miles, men were dropping out of the ranks, and falling to the earth exhausted or dead drunk. At 2 A. M., a Texan force was seen advancing on their flank, whereupon Lynde's Adjutant remarked, They have nothing to fear from us. Our men were halted, so many of them, at least, as had not already halted of their own accord; and the officers held a long council of war. Many privates of the command likewise took counsel, and decided to fight. Just then, Capt. Gibbs appeared from the officers' council, and ordered a retreat upon the camp, saying, We will fight them there. Arrived at the camp, our soldiers were ordered to lay down their arms, and informed, You are turned over as prisoners of war. The subordinate officers disclaimed any responsibility for this disgraceful surrender, laying the blame wholly upon Lynde. Our men were paroled, and permitted, as prisoners, to pursue their course northward, after listening to a speech from Col. Baylor, of
k road to Five Forks, where they fell upon Devin's division and Davies's brigade of cavalry there posted, drove them out in disorder, and followed them nearly to Dinwiddie C. H.; at length interposing between Devin and Sheridan's main line, and compelling Devin to make a long detour by the Boydton plank-road to rejoin his chief. The Rebels, mistaking this for a farther retreat, attempted pursuit; thereby presenting their flank and rear to Sheridan, who charged with the brigades of Gregg and Gibbs; compelling the enemy to let go of Devin, and permit him to rejoin his chief without farther trouble. And, though they now assailed the latter in superior force, fully resolved to drive him, they were unable to make any headway. Sheridan dismounted his troopers, posted them behind a slight breastwork, and received his assailants with so deadly a fire that they recoiled; and darkness fell before they were ready to try again. When morning came, they had been withdrawn by Lee; who doubtless
iment of the Legion, of which Col. Henningsen is colonel, but in consequence of his having charge of the infantry and artillery, under the immediate command of Lieut.-Col. Frank Anderson--who distinguished himself by the daring exploit of capturing Castillo, in Nicaragua, with forty-eight men, after Lockridge and Titus had failed with eight hundred--Capt. Imboden's, Capt. Lewis's, and Capt. Crane's University company were the companies engaged, with one six-pounder and one howitzer, under Major Gibbs, of South Carolina, Capt. McComas and Lieut. Pairo, of Richmond. The casualties were but trifling on our side, though we have to regret the death of Lieut. Howell, of Mississippi, (of Capt. McDonnell's company,) and that of one of Capt. Imboden's gallant rangers. Capt. Lewis was shot through the breast, but is doing well. Three privates were wounded in the above-named companies, one very severely. The only loss in the artillery was Lieut. Pairo's horse, shot under him. The enemy was o
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 2: early recollections of California--(continued). 1849-1850. (search)
harley Hoyt, my cousin; General Persifer F. Smith and wife; Gibbs, his aide-de-camp; Major Ogden, of the Engineers, and wife;ge of its then condition. At the time, he had on his staff Gibbs as aide-de-camp, and Fitzgerald as quartermaster. He also ard the Ohio. I opened the office at the custom-house, and Gibbs, Fitzgerald, and some others of us, slept in the loft of th. Smith and Mrs. Ogden did not bear it so philosophically. Gibbs, Fitzgerald, and I, could cruise around and find a meal, whin hired buildings near by. General Smith and his aide, Captain Gibbs, went to Larkin's house, and I was at my old rooms at D. We waited some time for the others, viz., Canby, Murray, Gibbs, and Sully, to come up, but as they were not in sight we mampt their recapture. In due season General Persifer Smith, Gibbs, and I, with some hired packers, started back for San Franc headquarters at Sonoma, in time to attend my fellow aide-de-camp Gibbs through a long and dangerous sickness, during which
m the west, and a little north of Dinwiddie C. H. This attack was very handsomely repulsed by General Smith's brigade of Crook's division, and the enemy was driven across Chamberlain's Creek. Shortly afterward, the enemy's infantry attacked on the same creek in heavy force, and drove in General Davies' brigade, and, advancing rapidly, gained the forks of the road at J. Boiseau's. This forced Devin, who was in advance, and Davies, to cross to the Boydton Road. General Gregg's brigade and General Gibbs', who had been toward Dinwiddie, then attacked the enemy in the rear very handsomely. This stopped the march toward the left of our infantry, and finally caused them to turn toward Dinwiddie and attack us in heavy force. The enemy then again attacked at Chamberlain's Creek, and forced Smith's position. At this time Capehart's and Pennington's brigades of Custer's division came up, and a very handsome fight occurred. The enemy have gained some ground, but we still hold in. front of
ited. With the aid of an old fire-engine the soldiers endeavored to put out the conflagration, but much property was destroyed. In the afternoon the wind moderated and the fire was controlled. Ruins of the unfinished courthouse at Columbia The Congaree river bridge The empty prison The Presbyterian lecture-room Hunt's house Freight depot, South Carolina railroad The catholic convent: as Columbia looked after Sherman's army passed, in 1865 Home of state surgeon-general Gibbs The Lutheran church Evans and Coggswell's printing shop Deserted main street The Methodist episcopal church, Washington street The South Carolina railroad offices: what war brought to the capital of South Carolina it was decided that Sherman should march through the Carolinas, destroying the railroads in both States as he went. A little more than a month Sherman remained in Savannah. Then he began another great march, compared with which, as Sherman himself decla
ited. With the aid of an old fire-engine the soldiers endeavored to put out the conflagration, but much property was destroyed. In the afternoon the wind moderated and the fire was controlled. Ruins of the unfinished courthouse at Columbia The Congaree river bridge The empty prison The Presbyterian lecture-room Hunt's house Freight depot, South Carolina railroad The catholic convent: as Columbia looked after Sherman's army passed, in 1865 Home of state surgeon-general Gibbs The Lutheran church Evans and Coggswell's printing shop Deserted main street The Methodist episcopal church, Washington street The South Carolina railroad offices: what war brought to the capital of South Carolina it was decided that Sherman should march through the Carolinas, destroying the railroads in both States as he went. A little more than a month Sherman remained in Savannah. Then he began another great march, compared with which, as Sherman himself decla
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