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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
act of August 3, 1861, authorizing the appointment of one assistant secretary of war. Subsequently three assistant secretaries were authorized by law.) Adjutant-General's Department Colonel Samuel Cooper * (resigned March 7, 1861) Brig.-Gen. Lorenzo Thomas (assigned to other duty March 23, 1863) Colonel Edward D. Townsend. Quartermaster's Department Brig.-Gen. Joseph F. Johnston * (resigned April 22, 1861) Brig.-Gen. Montgomery C. Meigs. Subsistence Department Colonel George Gibson (died Sept. 29, 1861) Brig.-Gen. Joseph P. Taylor (died Jan. 29, 1864) Brig.-Gen. Amos B. Eaton. Medical Department Colonel Thomas Lawson (died May 15, 1861) Colonel Clement A. Finley (retired April 14, 1862) Brig.-Gen. William A. Hammond Brig.-Gen. Joseph K. Barnes (appointed Aug. 22, 1864). Pay Department Colonel Benjamin F. Larned (died Sept. 6, 1862) Colonel Timothy P. Andrews (retired Nov. 29, 1864) Brig.-Gen. Benjamin W. Brice. Corps o
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 21: Cold Harbor of 1864. (search)
d. At first he could not think where he might get one, but it soon occurred to him that he had seen upon the streets within a few days a new wagon of John and George Gibson, Builders, and he went to Mr. George Gibson's house and waked him. Upon hearing the sad news, Mr. Gibson kindly consented not only to let him have the wagon, bMr. George Gibson's house and waked him. Upon hearing the sad news, Mr. Gibson kindly consented not only to let him have the wagon, but to go with him to the lines. He added, however, that the horse and vehicle were kept at a considerable distance from his house and that, as the night threatened to be stormy, young McCarthy had better go home and get some proper wraps and protections and meet him at an appointed place and time. As the boy reached home, or soonMr. Gibson kindly consented not only to let him have the wagon, but to go with him to the lines. He added, however, that the horse and vehicle were kept at a considerable distance from his house and that, as the night threatened to be stormy, young McCarthy had better go home and get some proper wraps and protections and meet him at an appointed place and time. As the boy reached home, or soon after, an ambulance drove up to the door and his Cousin Dan and the South Carolina soldier bore the captain's body into the house. As soon as they had deposited it and helped the family to arrange it as they desired, Dan kissed his uncle, aunt, and cousins, and was bidding them good-by, when the old gentleman made signs for him
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Index. (search)
eer troops, 159, 182-88, 193, 338 England and Englishmen, 52, 246 Episcopalians, 91-92, 139-40. Evans, Nathan George, 60-61, 65 Evelington Heights, Va., 106-107. Garber's Battery (Va.). See--Staunton Artillery (Va.) Gay, Edward S., 42 Georgia Infantry: 7th Regiment, 254- 55; 8th Regiment, 254-55; 12th Regiment, 120-22; 60th Regiment, 135, 282-83. Germans in Northern armies, 136 Gettysburg Campaign, 22, 26, 50, 52, 64, 139, 150-51, 156, 185, 192-228, 231, 267 Gibson, George, 295 Gibson, John, 295 Gilmer, Jeremy Francis, 182 Gilmer, Louisa Alexander (Mrs. Jeremy F.), 182 Goggin, James M., 174, 274 Gordon, Charles George, 367 Gordon, John Brown, 188, 210-12, 215-16, 218 Gordonsville, Va., 356 Grant, Ulysses Simpson, 238-40, 244, 248, 266-67, 269-70, 276, 285-88, 297, 303-10, 317, 341, 347 Grapevine army news, 162, 166 Greer, George, 212 Gregg, John, 276, 286 Griffith, Richard, 64, 85-86, 95 Grover, Benjamin, 63, 234 Guns, captu
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1, Chapter 40: social relations and incidents of Cabinet life, 1853-57. (search)
o the officers of the Army, especially by the Secretary of War, where they unbent like boys and told campaign stories-General Gibson, the Commissary-General, General Jessup, the Quartermaster-General, General Lawson, the Surgeon-General, General Tow now — the petty peculations, he said, were nauseating in that day-time has drawn a curtain over the unseemly sight. General Gibson coincided with him that people were growing steadily better. General Jessup, speaking of the force of habit, said hehave been spent for tobacco and used it for books. Now, said he, I have a fine library all bought with cigar money. General Gibson was a man so beloved that I never heard one derogatory word of him. He never was known to deny charity to those who ainion would willingly forfeit it, or having taken his advice doubted his wisdom. His nephew, whom he brought up, Colonel George Gibson, of the United States Army, long afterward proved the heredity of nature by his own life of usefulness. He was h
, Mar. 13, 1865. Doubleday, A., Mar. 13, 1865. Dyer, Alex. B., Mar. 13, 1865. Easton, L. E., Mar. 13, 1865. Eaton, Amos B., Mar. 13, 1865. Elliott, W. L., Nov. 13, 1865. Emory, Wm. H., Mar. 13, 1865. Fessenden, F., Mar. 13, 1865. Foster, John G., Mar. 13, 1865. Franklin, Wm. B., Mar. 13, 1865. French, Wm. H., Mar. 13, 1865. Fry, James B., Mar. 13, 1865. Garrard, Kenner, Mar. 13, 1865. Getty, Geo. W., Mar. 13, 1865. Gibbon, John, Mar. 13, 1865. Gibbs, Alfred, Mar. 13, 1865. Gibson, Geo., May 30, 1848. Gillem, Alvan G., April 12, 1865. Gilmore, Q. A., Mar. 13, 1865. Granger, Gordon, Mar. 13, 1865. Granger, Robt. S., Mar. 13, 1865. Grierson, B. H., Mar. 2, 1867. Griffin, Charles, Mar. 13, 1865. Grover, Cuvier, Mar. 13, 1865. Hardie, James A., Mar. 13, 1865. Harney, Wm. S., Mar. 13, 1865. Hartsuff, G. L., Mar. 13, 1865 Hatch, Edward, Mar. 2, 1867. Hawkins, J. P., Mar. 13, 1865. Hazen, Wm. B., Mar. 13, 1865. Heintzelman, S. P., Mar. 13, 1865. Hoffman, Wm., Mar
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gibson, George 1747- (search)
Gibson, George 1747- Military officer; born in Lancaster, Pa., Oct. 10, 1747. On the breaking-out of the Revolution he raised a company of 100 men at Fort Pitt, who were distinguished for their bravery and as sharp-shooters, and were called Gibson's lambs. These did good service throughout the war. A part of the time GibsonGibson's lambs. These did good service throughout the war. A part of the time Gibson was colonel of a Virginia regiment. To obtain a supply of gunpowder, he went down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers, with twenty-five picked men and a cargo of flour, ostensibly for trade, and returned with the desired ammunition. In the disastrous battle, Nov. 4, 1791, in which St. Clair was defeated, Colonel Gibson was mortallColonel Gibson was mortally wounded, dying in Fort Jefferson, O., Dec. 14, 1791. His brother John was also a soldier of the Revolution; born in Lancaster, Pa., May 23, 1730; was in Forbes's expedition against Fort Duquesne, and acted a conspicuous part in Dunmore's war in 1774. He commanded a Continental regiment in the Revolutionary War, his chief comma
tify all these evils. Officers and men rushed into Washington and thronged the hotels, boarding houses, and public offices with a saucy, idle, vagabond crowd. In many regiments even the arms were abused or allowed to become unserviceable from rust. But little by little the quartermaster general--the worthy, diligent, and able General Meigs --arranged to so supply every want in clothing and tentage as soon to relieve every cause of grumbling, and in like manner the commissary general, George Gibson, before long gave us plenty of new bread and fresh meat, so that the men became more contented and hopeful. And commanders in the field took the utmost pains to reestablish and maintain discipline. Congress voted 500,000 more men to help us, and McClellan, conspicuous, with the reputation of successful generalship in West Virginia, was speedily called to the command of the departments of Washington and of Northeastern Virginia. I heard General Sherman once say when he had listened
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Memorial. (search)
It was dedicated in the year 1848, a dedication hymn having been composed by the late John R. Thompson, and introduced into the hymn-book subsequently authorized by the Presbyterian General Assembly. In the process of time the edifice was found too small for the requirements of the congregation, and it was enlarged by throwing a transept across the eastern end, thus adding two wings to the building, enlarging and beautifying it at the same time. These alterations were carried out by Mr. George Gibson, an honored deacon of the church, and perhaps the only original member now living. An incident connected with the early history of the church illustrates the growth of the city in a westerly direction. When the officers of the First Presbyterian Church proposed to purchase the lot on which the Second Church stands, it was earnestly opposed by an influential member, on the ground that it was too far up-town, and that a congregation could not be gathered at such a remote region. S
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
died at home. Robert D. Diggs; living. John Donavan; living. Joseph S. Estis; dead. Frank B. Estis; died at Eimira, N. Y. Archy H. Eubank; living. Dunbar Edwards; died at hospital. Alfred Edwards; killed at Petersburg, June 15, 1864. John H. Eager; living. Richard Garrett; died at Elmira, N. Y. Thomas C. Garrett, captured at Petersburg, June 15, 1864; died at home. Augustus Garrett; living. John Gaines; died at home. Ben. Groom; died at hospital. George Gibson; killed at Howlett House, May 18, 1864. John C. Gibson; living. Adolphus Gibson; killed at Petersburg, May 18, 1864. B. E. Guthrie; died at home. Charles H. Huckstep; died at hospital. Allen Hilliard; died at home. William H. Hurtt; died at Elmira, N. Y. William Hogg; died at home. Joseph N. Knapp; living. Joseph Landrum; died at Soldiers' Home. Myrick Newcomb; died at Elmira, N. Y. William A. Murphy; died at hospital. John Marshall; died at Elmira, N.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
died at home. Robert D. Diggs; living. John Donavan; living. Joseph S. Estis; dead. Frank B. Estis; died at Eimira, N. Y. Archy H. Eubank; living. Dunbar Edwards; died at hospital. Alfred Edwards; killed at Petersburg, June 15, 1864. John H. Eager; living. Richard Garrett; died at Elmira, N. Y. Thomas C. Garrett, captured at Petersburg, June 15, 1864; died at home. Augustus Garrett; living. John Gaines; died at home. Ben. Groom; died at hospital. George Gibson; killed at Howlett House, May 18, 1864. John C. Gibson; living. Adolphus Gibson; killed at Petersburg, May 18, 1864. B. E. Guthrie; died at home. Charles H. Huckstep; died at hospital. Allen Hilliard; died at home. William H. Hurtt; died at Elmira, N. Y. William Hogg; died at home. Joseph N. Knapp; living. Joseph Landrum; died at Soldiers' Home. Myrick Newcomb; died at Elmira, N. Y. William A. Murphy; died at hospital. John Marshall; died at Elmira, N.
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