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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 3 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 50 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 26 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 3 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 22 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for R. L. Gibson or search for R. L. Gibson in all documents.

Your search returned 25 results in 5 document sections:

and K, Twenty-second regiment, and Holmes' light artillery. General Gibson was assigned in the latter part of March to command of the defeigades, about 500, and. Col. I. W. Patton's artillery, 360 strong. Gibson, on taking command, found that be had an enormous amount of intrenc Canby's two army corps sat down to a regular siege on March 27th. Gibson's works were soon almost surrounded by batteries, but he held out sApril the Federals obtained a lodgment in the works, and that night Gibson skillfully withdrew his troops, under orders not to risk their captMobile and thence to Meridian, General Taylor's headquarters. General Gibson estimated the loss of his whole command at 93 killed, 45 wounded and 250 captured, out of a total of less than 2,000. Said Gibson, in closing his report: Lieut. A. G. Clark of my staff, commandant of the May 8th, upon the occasion of the surrender of General Taylor, General Gibson issued an address to the Louisiana brigade, in which he said:
h, leaving Lieutenant-Colonel Barrow in command. The Fourth, Thirteenth (Maj. A. P. Avegno) and Nineteenth, with an Arkansas regiment, composed a brigade of Ruggles' division commanded by Col. R. L. Gibson. Major Avegno and Lieut. Benjamin King, Gibson's gallant aide-de-camp, were among the officers wounded. Ruggles' division was mainly Louisiana troops, the other brigades being Patton Anderson's and Preston Pond's. Anderson's brigade included the Seventeenth, Twentieth, Response battalion, aneverest I had ever heard. The First Louisiana brigade, under command of Col. R. L. Gibson, of the Thirteenth Louisiana, was conspicuous for its share in the events of both days. From an early hour on the 6th to the hour of retreat on the 7th, Gibson was everywhere in the front, with a loss in officers and men exceeding that of nearly every brigade at Shiloh. Col. H. W. Allen, of the Fourth Louisiana, was wounded in one of the fierce charges of the 6th. Later, at Baton Rouge, in August, he
hirteenth and Twentieth consolidated, under command of Colonel Gibson; the Sixteenth and Twenty-fifth consolidated, under Col in front. The two battalions of the brigade, led by Colonels Gibson and Fisk, advanced gallantly to do the work too heavy tagg, and W. L. Sibley. Capt. M. O. Tracy, acting major of Gibson's regiment, distinguished at Shiloh, Farmington and Perryvof the sharpshooters, was severely wounded. These and Colonel Gibson, Maj. Charles Guillet, Maj. F. C. Zacharie, Adjt. H. Hjt. A. O'Duhigg, were mentioned for soldierly conduct Colonel Gibson, speaking for his regiments, Thirteenth and Twentieth, Sixteenth consolidated, Major Zacharie, were the front of Gibson's line. They advanced close to the river and drove the enally. The regiment behaved throughout like veterans, said Gibson, Captains Ryan, Lipscomb, King, Bishop and McGrath and Lie had led him there. The Stone river being between him and Gibson, he was necessarily without orders for his guidance. Taki
Greenleaf's escort company. Later in the campaign the Fourth and Thirtieth were transferred to Gibson's brigade, and Nutt's company was added to Granbury's brigade. In the meager reports available of the Georgia campaign we catch glimpses of the heroic service of the Louisianians. General Gibson in his report of June 1st, describing previous operations, told of tenacious holding of his line,om there they were assigned to the rear guard. Hardly were they in line when attacked, and then Gibson, taking command of his own and Stovall's brigades, threw forward a heavy line of skirmishers. Hard to develop the enemy. They drove in the skirmishers and found the enemy in line of battle. Gibson was called back and put in reserve. Then immediately followed that determined assault by Hooker 34 killed, 150 wounded and 19 missing; out of 85 officers, 4 killed and 13 wounded. Said General Gibson: Capt. E. J. Blasco, Thirteenth, was killed in the charge at Resaca. He was a modest, skill
Richard Taylor has written, Gen. R. L. Gibson, now a member of Congress from Louisiana, held Spanish Fort with 2,500 men. Fighting all day and working all night, Gibson successfully resisted the efforts of the immense force against him until the evening of April 8th, when the enemy effected a lodgment threatening his only route of evacuation. Under instructions from Maury he withdrew his garrison in the night to Mobile, excepting his pickets, necessarily left. Gibson's stubborn defense and skillful retreat make this one of the best achievements of the war. After this General Gibson practiced law at New Orleans until he was elected to the United States General Gibson practiced law at New Orleans until he was elected to the United States Congress. He served as representative of the First district in the Forty-third to Forty-seventh Congresses, and in 1882 was elected United States senator, an office in which he represented his State with great ability until his death at Hot Springs, Ark., December 15, 1892. He also rendered valuable service to the cause of educa