hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 20 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 15 1 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 4 0 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for William Gibson or search for William Gibson in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
ithout apparent injury. The Confederate steamer Nashville had been closely watched for eight months by the blockading steamers Wissahickon, Lieutenant-Commander John L. Davis, the Dawn, Lieutenant John S. Barnes, and the Seneca, Lieutenant-Commander William Gibson. The Nashville lay under Fort McAllister loaded with cotton, and although a swift and well-appointed steamer, never ventured to run out. After several months she withdrew up the Ogeechee River and returned in the guise of a privat J. L. Gamble and B. Mitchell; Acting-Master's Mates, E. M. Dimon, A. W. Tripp and David McKewan; Engineers: Second-Assistant, J. P. Sprague; Third-Assistants, E. W. Koehl, F. C. Prindle and R. B. Hine. Steam gun-boat Seneca. Lieutenant-Commander, William Gibson; Lieutenant, Thomas C. Bowen; Assistant Surgeon, J H. Macomber; Assistant Paymaster, G. W. Beaman; Acting-Masters, J. H. Rodgers, Henry Vaughan and G. W. Ewen; Acting-Master's Mates, E. W. Fiske, J. W. Paine and C. E. Culver; Engin
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 36: operations of the South Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 1863.--operations in Charleston harbor, etc. (search)
th his flag flying on the Montauk, followed by the New Ironsides--which had crossed the bar — the Catskill, Nantucket, Weehawken, and Patapsco. Upon arrival abreast of the fort, the Montauk was anchored and fired the first gun, which was immediately followed by the other vessels — a nearer approach than twelve hundred yards, however, being prevented by an ebb-tide. Meanwhile, the gun-boats Paul Jones, Commander A. C. Rhind, Ottawa, Lieutenant-Commander W. D. Whiting, Seneca, Lieutenant-Commander William Gibson, Chippewa, Lieutenant-Commander T. C. Harris, and Wissahickon, Lieutenant-Commander John L. Davis (all under charge of Commander Rhind), were detailed to use their great guns at long range, which they did with good effect; at the same time the batteries were delivering a very steady and deliberate fire. At 4 P. M. the tide changed to flood, and the iron-clads got underway and closed in with the fort to a distance of three hundred yards, when the vessels opened fire again.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
hat the Confederates in Charleston were preparing for a simultaneous move on the blockade, inside and out, in order to cover the exit of a large quantity of cotton. The next day, the Sonoma, Commander George H. Cooper, and Nipsic, Lieutenant-Commander William Gibson, were sent as outside cruisers to cover the blockade south of Port Royal, where it was weakest, and where the chief effort was to be made. A plan was laid between General Foster and Admiral Dahlgren to make a diversion by cuttin, A. Delano, Jr. and W. H. Roberts; Acting-Master's Mate, W. H. Lewis; Engineers: First-Assistant, Henry Mason; Second-Assistant, F. H. Fletcher; Third-Assistants, William A. Dripps, Joseph Hooper and C. Kenyon. Steamer Nipsic. Lieutenant-Commander, Wm. Gibson; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, W. J. Gilfillen; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, H. T. Mansfield; Acting-Master, W. L. Churchill; Acting-Ensigns, H. A. Greene, J. A. Winchester and A. B. Prince; Acting-Master's Mates, G. S. Johnson, W. K. Orc