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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 116 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 36 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 13 1 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 12 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 12 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 10 0 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 10 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 10 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Joshua R. Giddings or search for Joshua R. Giddings in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

ad been written in immediate support of the Tyler-Calhoun negotiation. Col. Benton, in his Thirty years view, directly charges that the letter was drawn from Gen. Jackson expressly to be used to defeat Mr. Van Buren's nomination, and secure, if possible, that of Mr. Calhoun instead; and it doubtless exerted a strong influence adverse to the former, although Gen. Jackson was among his most unflinching supporters to the last. Mr. John Quincy Adams had united with Mr. William Slade, Joshua R. Giddings, and ten other anti-Slavery Whig members of the XXVIIth Congress (March 3, 1843), in a stirring address to the people of the Free States, warning them against the Annexation intrigue, as by no means abandoned, but still energetically, though secretly, prosecuted. In that address, they recited such of the fore-going facts as were then known to them, saying: We, the undersigned, in closing our duties to our constituents and our country as members of the Twenty-Seventh Congress, feel
sachusetts, the nomination was made unanimous. In the evening, the Convention proceeded to ballot for Vice-President, when Hannibal Hamlin, of Maine, received, on the first ballot, 194 votes; Cassius M. Clay, of Kentucky, 101 1/2; and there were 1656 cast for other candidates. On the second ballot, Mr. Hamlin received 367 votes to 99 for all others, and was declared duly nominated. On motion of Mr. George D. Blakey, of Kentucky, the nomination was made unanimous. On motion of Mr. Joshua R. Giddings, of Ohio, it was Resolved, That we deeply sympathize with those men who have been driven, some from their native States and others from the States of their adoption, and are now exiled from their homes on account of their opinions; and we hold the Democratic party responsible for the gross violations of that clause of the Constitution which declares that citizens of each State shall be entitled to all the privileges and immunities of citizens of the several States. And then,
; she offers a reward for the arrest of Garrison, 122; withdraws from the Democratic Convention, 315; Mr. Gaulden protests, 316; Secession meeting in, 330; Military Convention at Milledgeville, 387; Stephens's Union speech, 342 to 844; her appeal for delay kept secret in the South Carolina Convention, 345; Secession of and vote thereon, 347; population in 1860, 351; offers volunteers to South Carolina, 411); seizure of Federal property by, 411. Ghent, treaty of, 102; do. results, 176. Giddings, Joshua R., 159; 321. Gilman, Mr., of Alton, Ill., 139 to 141. Gilmer, John A., of N. C., resolution by, 305-6. Gilmer, Thos. W., to The Madisonian, 156; 158. gist, Gov., of S. C., summons his Legislature, 830; his Message, 330-31. Gleason, Capt., at siege of Lexington, Mo., 588-9. glen, Mr., of Miss., in Dem. Convention, 314. Globe, The, 143. Godfrey, Gilman & Co., in Alton mob, 139-141. gold, export of, by 8th Decennial Census, 23. Goliad, Texas, battle at,