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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 116 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 36 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 13 1 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 12 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 12 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 10 0 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 10 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 10 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights. You can also browse the collection for Joshua R. Giddings or search for Joshua R. Giddings in all documents.

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John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights, Chapter 1: Theodore Roosevelt and the Abolitionists (search)
are, not even excepting the saloon-keepers themselves, the most efficient allies on whom intemperance and the liquor traffic can count. Anti-Slavery men like Giddings, who supported Clay, were doing a thousandfold more effective work for the cause they had at heart than all the voters who supported Birney; or, to speak more acof slavery than any other person in America, it would appear that the score of responsibility on their part was fairly evened up. In citing the action of Joshua R. Giddings as an anti-third-party man, Mr. Roosevelt is not altogether fortunate. Subsequent to the presidential campaign of 1844, the third-party Abolitionists held a convention in Pittsburg, in which Giddings was a leading actor. As chairman of the committee on platform, he submitted a resolution declaring that both of the old parties were hopelessly corrupt and unworthy of confidence. The Abolitionists could not see that they were under obligation to either of the old parties, believin
ket, and also a conspicuous member of the U. S. Senate. Going westward, we come to Ohio, which became, early in the movement, the dominating center of Abolitionist influence. Salmon P. Chase was there. James G. Birney, after being forced out of Kentucky, was there. Ex-United States Senator Thomas Morris, a candidate for the Vice-Presidency on the Liberty party ticket, was there. Leicester King and Samuel Lewis, Abolition candidates for the governorship of the State, were there. Joshua R. Giddings and United States Senator Ben. Wade were there. One great advantage the Ohio Abolitionists enjoyed was that they were harmonious and united. In the East that was not the case. There was a bitter feud between the Garrisonians, who relied on moral suasion, and the advocates of political action. All Ohio Abolitionists were ready and eager to employ the ballot. There is another name, in speaking of Ohio, that must not be omitted. Dr. Townsend was the man who made Salmon P. Chase
84; removal, 185; freedom proclamation, 185. Frost, John, 203. Frothingham, 0. B., 204. Fugitive Slave Law, 5, 121. Fuller, John E., 201. Fussell, Bartholomew, 203. G Gamble, Hamilton R., 160; and emancipation ordinance of, 163; and military control of Missouri, 163. Garrison, William Lloyd, 13 21, 26, 201, 202; dragged through streets of Boston, 32; imprisonment for libel, 54; reception in England, 131-132; speech at Exeter Hall, 131. Genius of Universal Emancipation, The, 51. Giddings, Joshua R., 2, 6, 205. Gillinghamm, Chalkly, 203. Goodell, William, 203, 205. Grant, General, 44; and Charcoals, 172; nomination by Missouri Radicals, 174-176; capture of Fort Donelson, 192. Greeley, Horace, 142, 148, 178, 179. Green, Beriah, 203. Green, William, Jr., 203. Grimke sisters, 38, 103-106, 204. H Hale, John P., 10, 205. Hall, John B., 201. Hall, Robert B., 203. Hallock's Order Number Three, 141. Harrison, Wm. Henry, 5. Hay, John, 136. Henry, Patrick, Williamsbur