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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 4 0 Browse Search
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formerly used for lining their capacious fireplaces. Dut′tees. Coarse, unbleached calicoes of India. Du′ty. The useful effect of an engine in work performed. This term was first explained in a definite and precise manner by Davies Gilbert, President of the Royal Society, in a paper read before that body in 1827. The criterion of the efficiency of ordinary machines is force, multiplied by the space through which it acts; the effect which they produce, measured in the same way, r what has been called in other countries the dynamic unit; and by this criterion one bushel of coal has been found to perform a duty of thirty, forty, and even fifty millions. This has been more than doubled since the writing of the paper of Mr. Gilbert. The duty is not an expression of the work done, as this would include the power to overcome friction and other resistances, but is the actual useful effect, expressed in pounds weight, of water actually raised. The duty of the Newark wa
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
t with Dr. Buckland, about half past 9 o'clock, to Dr. Burton's, the Professor of Divinity, who lives in quite a magnificent style, his rooms hung with velvet. There I found Dr. Chalmers, a very plain, earnest, simple man, of nearly seventy; Davies Gilbert, the late President of the Royal Society, fully seventy years old, but extremely pleasant and animated; and a large number of the canons of Christ Church, besides our host and his handsome, agreeable wife, Dr. and Mrs. Buckland, the younger Ct indeed flatter any man; but he also seems plain, straightforward, and sincere, speaking his broad Scotch as honestly as possible, and expressing his own opinions faithfully, but entirely considerate of the opinions and feelings of others. Mr. Gilbert's enthusiasm is more prompt and obvious than that of Dr. Chalmers, and it gratified me a good deal to hear him say, in the midst of the savants of Oxford, that Dr. Bowditch's La Place is the first work extant on Astronomy. But I think Dr. Buc
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
Sir, William, 175. Gener, 346. Geneva, visits, 152-158. George (Iv.), Prince Regent, 67. Georgetown, D. C., visits, 28, 30, 38. German language, difficulty of studying it, 11, 25, 26; high and low, 87. German literature, 87-89, 118-120; republic of letters, 99-102. German metaphysics, 96-99. German political and moral state, 102, 103. German universities, 75, 89, 90, 102. Gesenius, W., 111. Gibraltar, visits, 235, 236. Gifford, William, 58, 60, 62, 294. Gilbert, Davies, 405. Giustiniani, Prince, Nuncio, 188, 193, 194 note. Godwin, Mrs., William, 130, 294. Godwin, William, 130, 294. Goethe, Wolfgang A. von, 113-115, 165, 211, 455, 490 note, 500. Goltz, Count, 122. Gonzales, librarian, Madrid, 197. Gott, Messrs., 438. Gottingen, 11, 395; G. T. arrives at, 69; life there, 70-107, 116-121; description of, 74, 75; leaves there, 121. Gottingen University, 70, 72, 75, 76, 82; during the French War, 83, 84; Literary Club, 85; secret societies
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 9: (search)
een him so as to know him, though he supposed he must have met him in large parties; a curious fact, considering Rogers's own universality. He urged us again to dine with him to-morrow, said he would give up dining abroad himself and insure us seats at the opera, to see Taglioni, who appears for the first time; in short, he was exceedingly kind. But it is out of the question. To-morrow is our last day in London. . . . . June 5.—. . . . We went to breakfast at Kenyon's, where we met Davies Gilbert,—the former President of the Royal Society,—Guillemard, young Southey, and Mr. Andrew Crosse, of Somersetshire, who has made so much noise of late with his crystallized minerals, formed by galvanic action, and especially with the insects that appeared in some experiments with acids and silica. The object of the breakfast was to show these minerals and insects, and they are really very marvellous and curious. Crosse, too, is worth knowing; a fine, manly, frank fellow, of about fifty <
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
sits, I. 28, 30, 38. Gerhard, E., II. 58, 59, 66, 328, 329. German language, difficulty of studying it, I. 11, 25, 26; high and low, 87. German literature, I. 87-89, 118-120; republic of letters, 99-102. German metaphysics, I. 96-99. German political and moral state, I. 102, 103. German Universities, I. 89, 90, 102. Gesenius, W., I. 111. Gibraltar, visits, I. 235, 236. Gibson, John, II. 360, 399. Gibson, Miss, Il 332. Gifford, William, I. 58, 60, 62, 294. Gilbert, Davies, I. 405, II. 182. Girod de lAin, II 131. Giustiniani, Prince, Nuncio, I. 188, 193, 194 note, II 73, 74, 79, 85. Gladstone, Right Hon. W. E., II. 378, 425. Glenelg, Lord, II 362, 363, 365, 366, 371. Gloucester, Duchess of, II. 146. Godley, J. R, II 358, 363, 368 Godwin, William, and Mrs. W., I. 130, 294. Goethe, Wolfgang A. von, I. 113, 114, 115, 165, 211, 455, 490 note, 500. Goldsborough, Capt. U. S. N., II. 310. Goltz, Count, I 122. Gonzales, librarian,