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The Daily Dispatch: January 30, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
ature for three terms. He was a member of Camp Sumter, United Confederate Veterans, and of various other fraternal organizations, and enjoyed the esteem of a wide circle of friends. His widow survives him, and three children: Matthew Baird, Jesse Gilbert, and Mary Louise. Captain Collyar Douglas Barksdale, who was killed at the second battle of Manassas, was born in Laurens county, S. C., October 12, 1828. His father was Allen Barksdale, of Laurens county, a planter, sheriff, and member fired by their love and faith in the cause of the South, left college, farm or home, to fight and if need be die for it. He was the only son of John T. Bennett, a farmer who served his county as a magistrate for forty-five years, and Elizabeth (Gilbert) Bennett. He was reared on the old home plantation and educated by his father, who was a fine Greek and Latin scholar, and at the outbreak of the war was attending the Charleston medical college. Immediately after Fort Sumter was fired upon he
Arrival of deserters from the rebel army — interesting details of their escape.[from the Chicago Tribune, Jan. 22 Three young men, named Charles Cox, Jesse Gilbert, and W. J. Morrell, deserters from the Southern army, arrived at the Tremont House on Monday night, having been forwarded from Cairo to this city by Geo. W. Gage, Esq., and other citizens, who were cognizant of their condition. Cox, in company with Gilbert, Morrell, and a fourth party, named Gardner, who has remained in Cairo, are all strong Union men, who, prior to the breaking out of the war, had been engaged in various capacities at the South. Upon the commencement of hostilities, they, in common with numerous other Northern men, were impressed into the rebel army. Gilbert, who had formerly been connected with Rice's equestrian establishment, was compelled to join a Louisiana regiment, Cox, who was a compositor in the office of that rampant organ of Secession, the Memphis Appeal, was offered his choice — to