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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Lee's West Virginia campaign. (search)
lle, by which Cheat Mountain might be turned. he sent Colonel Gilliam, with his own Virginia Regiment and Colonel Lee's Sixtndezvous at Huntersville, and advance by the Pass that Colonel Gilliam had been directed to occupy, to the rear of the enemy'ry, and Marye's and Stanley's batteries of artillery. Colonel Gilliam was at Valley Mountain Pass, fifteen miles west of Hucupation of Valley Mountain by a force as large as that of Gilliam could escape the observation of the Federals, and its posithe time of his probable advance, he proceeded to join Colonel Gilliam at Valley Mountain. He took with him Major Lee's cavaconnoitering. It had now been eight or ten days since Colonel Gilliam first arrived at Valley Mountain Pass. At that time hand patient endurance in this campaign; and Colonels Burk, Gilliam, Campbell, Lee, Munford, Maney, Hatten and Savage were worquarter himself. He, therefore, directed Loring to detach Gilliam with his own regiment (the battalion of State Regulars) an
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Death of General John H. Morgan. (search)
town fell asleep. Colonel Miller, who was posted near Bull's gap, did not know of the presence of Morgan in that part of the country until six P. M., September 3d. It is said that a woman brought him the news, and many pictures have been painted of her rapid horseback ride from Greenville to the gap; but upon a recent visit to Greenville, those having personal knowledge of the matter denied that there was a woman in it. But, however this may be, when the news came, Colonel Miller and General Gilliam held a short consultation, and the command was ordered to be in readiness to move. At eleven o'clock that night, in the midst of a terrible thunder-storm, which fairly drenched the soldiers, the Thirteenth Tennessee moved out toward Greenville, by way of the Arnett road. At midnight they were followed by the rest of the command, making a total of about two thousand men, fifteen hundred of whom were Tennesseeans. The storm increased, the rain fell in torrents, the heavens fairly shook