Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for John P. Gillis or search for John P. Gillis in all documents.

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Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: the Port Royal expedition. (search)
hen lying more than four miles outside of a straight line connecting the earthworks, situated, as General Drayton states, two and five-eighths miles apart and soon to be the objects of attack. The commanding officers of vessels, previously instructed, on weighing anchor took position in lines as follows: Main column, flag-ship Wabash leading, Commander C. R. P. Rodgers; side-wheel steam frigate Susquehanna, Captain J. S. Lardner; sloop Mohican, Commander S. W. Godon; sloop Seminole, Commander J. P. Gillis; sloop Pawnee, Lieutenant-Commanding R. H. Wyman; gunboat Unadilla, Lieutenant-Commanding Napoleon Collins; gunboat Ottawa, Lieutenant-Commanding Thomas H. Stevens; gunboat Pembina, Lieutenant-Commanding John P. Bankhead, and sail-sloop Vandalia, Commander Francis S. Haggerty, towed by the Isaac Smith, LieutenantCommand-ing J. W. A. Nicholson. It will be remembered that the last-named vessel, to prevent foundering, had thrown her broadside guns overboard in the gale of the 1st. T
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: strategic Reconnoissances. (search)
ed the vicinity of the enemy at 3 A. M. of the 19th of April, but not without discovery and the precipitate flight of the enemy. Shortly after daylight a considerable force of mounted riflemen were seen advancing rapidly. They opened fire, but after a skirmish of half an hour retired as hastily as they had advanced. In this affair three of the sailors were wounded, and the force returned unmolested at leisure to the vessel. On the 29th, the same officer on board of the Hale, Lieutenant-Commanding Gillis, with Assistant-Surgeon Brintnall, Mate Henry Parsons, 22 men, and a boat armed with a howitzer, proceeded to destroy a battery of the enemy near the junction of the Dawho, PawPaw, and South Edisto Rivers. When the Hale was within eighteen hundred yards, the battery opened fire and continued as the bends of the river favored. One long reach had to be made under a raking fire, but the shells from the Hale had been so effective that when the vessel was making a direct course for t
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter VIII Hatteras InletRoanoke Island. (search)
. Stellwagen, and the Peabody, Lieutenant R. B. Lowry, took on board 500 of the 20th Regiment N. Y. Volunteers, Colonel Weber; 220 of the Ninth N. Y. Volunteers, Colonel Hawkins; 100 of the Union Coast Guard, Captain Nixon, and 60 of the 2d U. S. Artillery, Lieutenant Larned. With commendable alacrity they left the same day (26th of August) with the flag-ship of Stringham, the steam frigate Minnesota, Captain G. I. Van Brunt; steam frigate Wabash, Captain Samuel Mercer; Monticello, Commander John P. Gillis; Pawnee, Commander S. C. Rowan, and Revenue Cutter Harriet Lane, Captain John Faunce. The army tug Fanny, under the command of Lieutenant Peirce Crosby, of the navy, also accompanied the expedition. The transports towed two schooners, having large, unwieldy iron surf-boats on board. The same afternoon this force rounded Cape Hatteras and anchored off shore near the proposed point of debarkation, which was some three miles east of Hatteras Inlet. Surfboats were hoisted out,
I.—names of vessels, character of armament, and officers commanding them in the attack on Port Royal, November 7, 1861. flag-officer Francis S. Dupont and Captain Charles H. Davis, Chief of staff, with flag on board of the Wabash. Name of vessel.Name of officer commanding.Battery. WabashCommander C. R. P. Rogers.28 IX-in., 14 Viii-in., 2 X-in. pivots. SusquehannaCaptain J. L. Lardner15 Viii-inch guns. MohicanCommander S. W. Godon2 XI-in. pivots, 4 32-pounders. SeminoleCommander John P. Gillis1 XI-in. pivot, 4 32-pounders. PocahontasCommander Percival Drayton1 XI-in. pivot, 4 32-pounders. PawneeLieut.--Com'g R. H. Wyman8 IX.-in. pivot, 2 12-pounder rifles. UnadillaLt.-Com'g Napoleon Collins1 XI in. pivot, 1 20-pdr. rifle, 2 24-pdr. howitzers. OttawaLt-Com'g T. H. Stevens1 XI-in. pivot, 1 20-pounder rifle, 2 24-pounder howitzers. PembinaLt.-Com'g J. P. Bankhead1 XI-in. pivot, 1 20-pounder rifle, 2 24-pounder howitzers. SenecaLt.-Com'g Daniel Ammen1 XI-in. piv
e Navy, 10, 121, 162 Frailey, Commander James M., 81 Freeborn, the, 107 Freeman, Acting-Master, 145 French, Master Charles A., 177 Fundenburg, Surgeon W. F., 80 G. Galveston, Texas, 74 Gatlin, General, 170 Gemsbok, the, 194 George's Creek, the, .S. transport, 49 Georgetown, S. C., 66 Georgia, the, 156, 194 Gettysburg, the, 220 Gibson, Lieutenant-Commander W., 85, 128 Giddings, Master John E., 177, 189 Gillett, Paymaster, 237 Gillis, Commander J. P., 21, 63, 165 Gillmore, General, 122 et seq.; before Fort Wagner, 127 et seq., 133 et seq., 138, 146, 153 Glassell, Lieutenant, 141 Glisson, Commander 0. S., 175, 223 Godon, Commander S. W., 18, 21, 48, 56, 58 Goldsborough, Rear-Admiral L. M., 176 et seq.. 182 Governor, the, U. S. steamer, 14, 17 Granite, the, 177 Grant, General U. S., 215, 227 Graves, Master G. W., 177, 189 Great Britain, opinions there on the destruction of Charleston Harbor, 41 et seq.;