Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Gillmore or search for Gillmore in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
was under orders to advance, at day-break, to Port Walthall Junction, three miles nearer. The line of the enemy's forces under Butler, comprising the corps of Gillmore and W. F. Smith (10th and 18th) was generally parallel to our intermediate line of works, somewhat curved, concentric and exterior to our own, they held our own Sumter, trained for the beach of Morris Island, gave notice that another attempt was to be made to throw a column into Wagner by escalade. It was even so. General Gillmore, fully alive to the difficulties which the topographical features of the ground presented for regular approaches, and counting with reason upon the damagingbefore dawn on the 27th, under cover of the flying sap, the trenches were pushed about one hundred yards nearer to the fort. Notwithstanding this success, General Gillmore, in his report, speaks of this period as the dark and gloomy days of the siege, and of the progress made as discouragingly slow, and even painfully uncertain
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of services in Charleston Harbor. (search)
n the part of the enemy, and almost instantaneously a rapid succession of guns from Sumter, trained for the beach of Morris Island, gave notice that another attempt was to be made to throw a column into Wagner by escalade. It was even so. General Gillmore, fully alive to the difficulties which the topographical features of the ground presented for regular approaches, and counting with reason upon the damaging effect of the awful bombardment, both upon the work itself and the morale of the galmore's fifth and last parallel was at once established on the ground thus won, and before dawn on the 27th, under cover of the flying sap, the trenches were pushed about one hundred yards nearer to the fort. Notwithstanding this success, General Gillmore, in his report, speaks of this period as the dark and gloomy days of the siege, and of the progress made as discouragingly slow, and even painfully uncertain. The ground between his front and Wagner was thickly studded with torpedoes, his