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Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 204 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 167 1 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 165 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 111 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 76 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 75 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 65 3 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 57 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 57 1 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 48 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Q. A. Gillmore or search for Q. A. Gillmore in all documents.

Your search returned 84 results in 5 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 36: operations of the South Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 1863.--operations in Charleston harbor, etc. (search)
ors on the first occasion. The plan of General Gillmore was to dispossess the enemy of Morris Isl-fire on Fort Wagner from the vessels and General Gillmore's batteries, and the Confederates all wenen dismounted, and another had burst, and General Gillmore, supposing from the terrible fire which hs, landed them on Morris Island, and captured Gillmore's army and everything belonging to it. But th him to keep his word. The first thing General Gillmore did toward securing possession of Morris measures did not affect the movements of General Gillmore, who, on August 17th, opened fire on SumtW. Turner, Chief of Artillery, reports to General Gillmore as follows: The gorge wall of the for obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard. General Gillmore answered the different points of this letvanced too far to allow of retraction. General Gillmore was of the opinion that Sumter could not the meantime a deserter had gone over to General Gillmore with the information that the Confederate[61 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 38: review of the work done by the Navy in the year 1863. (search)
The Navy Department had made great efforts to capture the heavy defences inside Charleston bar, and Rear-Admiral DuPont had made a vigorous attack with his iron-clads and Monitors on the heaviest line of works; but, owing to the destructive fire of the enemy and the insufficiency of his force of vessels, DuPont very properly withdrew. The wisdom of his course was subsequently shown during the combined Army and Navy operations against Charleston, under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren and Brigadier-General Gillmore. On the later occasion, sixty siege-guns were brought to bear on the enemy, and Fort Sumter was reduced to pulp, yet the difficulties of an advance of the naval vessels were so great owing to the obstructions in the channel, that notwithstanding the energy and bravery of the commander-in-chief, his officers and men, at the end of 1863 Charleston still remained in possession of the Confederates, although practically useless to the latter. If the Federal Government could not boas
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 39: Miscellaneous operations, land and sea.--operations in the Nansemond, Cape Fear, Pamunky, Chucka Tuck and James Rivers.--destruction of blockade-runners.--adventures of Lieutenant Cushing, etc. (search)
e between Culpeper Court House and Richmond, and in case he should not defeat him he could make a junction with Butler, already established on the James, and be in a position to threaten Richmond on the south side, with his left wing resting on the James, above the city. In accordance with his instructions, General Butler moved his forces up the James River, where he had the assistance of the Navy to cover his landing, which was accomplished without difficulty. Having been joined by General Gillmore on the 4th of May, Butler occupied City Point and Bermuda Hundred on the 5th; on the 6th he was in position with his main force and intrenched, and on the 7th made a reconnaissance of the Petersburg and Richmond Railroad, and destroyed a bridge a few miles from Richmond. From this, General Butler formed the opinion that he had succeeded in getting in the rear of the Confederates, and held the key to the back-door of Richmond. He accordingly telegraphed to Washington: We have landed
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
anuary, 1864. On the 26th of October, 1863, General Gillmore opened fire upon Fort Sumter from his battery but that business had better have been left to General Gillmore with his siege-guns, and the attack of the MonOn November 16th more congenial work offered. General Gillmore telegraphed: The enemy have opened a heavy fire aid in his power to the land-batteries under General Gillmore. The following review of the services of Admiver, three at Port-Royal, and one at Ossabaw. General Gillmore having arrived. arrangements were immediatelying the progress of the engineering work under General Gillmore, which was of the most laborious kind, the ironew works on the side of Wagner, or any assault on Gillmore's position. In fact, the fire from the fleet enfich was of no use to any one, with his guns. General Gillmore, who seemed to think for the present that he hshot and shell on the surrounding forts. If General Gillmore at a distance of over 5,000 yards had reduced
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 52: operations about Charleston, 1865.--fall of Charleston, Savannah, etc. (search)
closed, and few of the citizens appeared. But for the presence of the negroes, it might have passed for a city stricken with the pestilence. Notwithstanding the great outcry that had been made by some of the Confederate officers against General Gillmore's barbarity in firing front the Swamp Angel into the town, the place gave little indication of having suffered from an enemy's guns. Here and there the ground was plowed up by a rifle-shell, or the front of a house was scarred by the fragobstructions was verified; but in the obscurity of the night it was difficult to ascertain precisely what they were, particularly as the rebels were then in strong force at the locality, and very little time was permitted for examination. General Gillmore's impressions at the time may be gathered from the following portion of his telegram to me August 4: My scout has just reported that the line of floating buoys reaching from Sumter to Moultrie has disappeared since yesterday. These buo