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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 25 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 13 3 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 9 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 8 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 8, 1864., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A.. You can also browse the collection for Harry Gilmor or search for Harry Gilmor in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 5 document sections:

Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 30: Averill's raid and the winter campaign. (search)
. By the last of December he was ready to move, and started, accompanied by McNeil's company of partisan rangers and Gilmor's Maryland battalion, crossing the mountain over a rugged road near Orkney Springs. I started McClanahan's battery of ar battery, that being the only artillery there was in the valley. Rosser with his brigade, McNeil's company, a part of Gilmor's battalion, the battery and some wagons passed through Brock's Gap into the valley of Lost River, while Thomas' brigade rg to intercept, but he succeeded in passing in safety between the columns sent against him. McNeil's company and part of Gilmor's battalion had been sent west to the Allegheny Mountains to collect cattle and were now returning by the way of Petersbu the railroad west of Staunton where forage could be obtained, a small force being left to picket down the valley. Major Gilmor subsequently made a raid down the valley, and captured a train on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. After the troops
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 38: operations in lower valley and Maryland. (search)
dge at its mouth, and then to move by North Mountain depot to Haynesville on the road from Martinsburg to Williamsport; and, early on the morning of the 3rd, Bradley Johnson was sent by Smithfield and Leetown, to cross the railroad at Kearneysville east of Martinsburg, and unite with McCausland at Haynesville, so as to cut off the retreat of Sigel, who was at Martinsburg with a considerable force. Breckenridge moved, on the same morning, direct from Martinsburg, with his command preceded by Gilmor's battalion of cavalry, while I moved with Rodes' and Ramseur's divisions, over the route taken by Johnson, to Leetown. On the approach of Breckenridge, Sigel, after very slight skirmishing, evacuated Martinsburg, leaving behind considerable stores, which fell into our hands. McCausland burned the bridge States to save their houses. Mosby's battalion, though called guerillas by the enemy, was a regular organization in the Confederate Army, and was merely serving on detached duty under Gen
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 40: in front of Washington. (search)
emain in front of the fortifications during the 12th, and retire at night, as I was satisfied that to remain longer would cause the loss of my entire force. Johnson had burned the bridges over the Gunpowder, on the Harrisburg and Philadelphia roads, threatened Baltimore, and started for Point Lookout, but I sent an order for him to return. The attempt to release the prisoners, of which I was informed by General Lee, was not made, as the enemy had received notice of it in some way. Major Harry Gilmor, who burned the bridge over the Gunpowder on the Philadelphia road, captured Major General Franklin on a train at that point, but he was permitted to escape, either by the carelessness or exhaustion of the guard placed over him, before I was informed of the capture. On the afternoon of the 12th, a heavy reconnoitring force was sent out by the enemy, which, after severe skirmishing, was driven back by Rodes' division with but slight loss to us. About dark we commenced retiring and d
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 50: operations in 1865. (search)
ich were without horses were sent to Lynchburg by railroad. This was a deplorable state of things, but it could not be avoided, as the horses of the cavalry and artillery would have perished had they been kept in the Valley. Echols' brigade of Wharton's division was subsequently sent to Southwestern Virginia to report to General Echols for special duty, and McNeil's company of partisan rangers, and Woodson's company of unattached Missouri cavalry, were sent to the county of Hardy, Major Harry Gilmor being likewise ordered to that county, with the remnant of his battalion, to take charge of the whole, and operate against the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad; but he was surprised and captured there, at a private house, soon after his arrival. Two very small brigades of Wharton's division, and Nelson's battalion with the few pieces of artillery which had been retained, were left, as my whole available force, and these were in winter quarters near Fishersville, on the Central railroad betwe
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
, 387 Georgetown Pike, 387, 389, 390, 391 Georgia Troops, 27, 49, 50, 67, 78, 81, 95, 97, 98, 99, 107, 109, 111, 115, 116, 118, 124, 125, 127, 131, 153, 173-77, 180, 185, 190, 193, 259, 280, 333, 336, 349, 362, 388, 390, 393, 468 Germana Ford, 317, 319, 324, 325, 344, 346 Germantown, 40 Gettysburg, 254-58,264, 266,267,271, 272, 275, 276, 278, 279, 282, 286- 288, 290, 478 Gibbon, General (U. S. A.), 198, 206, 209, 225 Gibson, Captain, 28 Gibson, Colonel, 153 Gilmor, Major H., 333-34, 338, 340, 383, 394, 460 Gilmore, General (U. S. A.), 393 Gloucester Point, 59, 61 Godwin, Colonel, 249, 274-75, 311- 314 Godwin, General, 423, 427 Goggin, Major, 449, 451 Goldsborough, Major, 243 Goodwin, Colonel, 385 Gordon, General J. B., 192, 209-11, 221-25,227,229,230,232-33,239, 240,242-44,246,248-250,252-53, 256-263, 267-275, 280, 305, 311, 245-351, 359, 363, 372, 374, 381, 384-85, 388, 392, 396, 403, 406, 408-09,414,419-23,425,429,434, 438-444, 446, 448