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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 3 1 Browse Search
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t he had any idea that he was suspected, or that any one was sent to relieve him-says that he has heard that Johnston has been talking, very openly, secession doctrines in San Francisco. The thing is all up. His resignation is accepted, and the feeling is so strong against those who have abandoned the country, that it would be utterly useless to say a word. General Johnston's resignation was accepted on the 6th of May, to take effect on the 3d instant. From his sister-in-law, Mrs. Eliza Gilpin, already mentioned as the widow of his brother, Josiah Stoddard Johnston, he received a letter, dated at Philadelphia, April 15th, breathing the excited feeling of devotion to the Union just then newly aroused by the fall of Fort Sumter. The following extract, however, contains all that is essential to this memoir: My very dear brother: The newspaper account of your having been superseded in your command, and without any reasons having been assigned for it, has given me much anxi
on accepted. impending War. a dread alternative. cherished Gift. surveillance and escape. on the road. the desert. the Comet. Tucson. the Pimos Indians, anecdote. Federal troops. running the gantlet. an Indian massacre. the Rio Grande. anecdote. escape of Moore and Lord. Lynde's surrender. through Texas. anecdotes. the journey summed up. A nation's suspense and joy. Arrival at Richmond. General Johnston remained at Los Angeles from May 2d to June 16th. His letter to Mrs. Gilpin, already given (page 273), reveals in some measure his feelings at this time. The Administration, which thought the personal indignity put upon him atoned for by an offer of promotion, and the crooked policy of discrediting an upright soldier an act merely political, left his reputation to this late vindication. The arbitrary delay, without cause or explanation, in accepting his resignation, as if to embarrass his action, evidently aroused General Johnston's indignation. The acceptance