Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Henry D. Gilpin or search for Henry D. Gilpin in all documents.

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of an early period, which show legal ability and acumen rare in any country. Nowhere were the characteristic traits of Kentucky people more fully displayed than in Mason County, from whose pioneer families proceeded many noted men; but from under no roof-tree went forth a hardier brood than from that which sheltered the boyhood of Albert Sidney Johnston. First among his brothers in age and eminence was Josiah Stoddard Johnston. The following facts, obtained from a sketch of him by Hon. Henry D. Gilpin, of Philadelphia, and from other sources, will give some idea of his career. Born in Salisbury, Connecticut, November 24, 1784, he was taken to Kentucky by his father at an early age. When twelve years old his father carried him to New Haven, Connecticut, to school, where he remained some years; but he completed his academic education at Transylvania University, Lexington, Kentucky, and then studied law with the famous George Nicholas. His acquirements were solid, and his reading
on's letters. Indian policy. policy toward Mexico. General Johnston's view. hostility engendered toward him in the President. compliments from his army. visits New Orleans. effects of his wound. visits Kentucky. noticed by Jackson. Henry D. Gilpin's letter to him. return to Texas. letter to Mr. Hobbs. differences with the Administration. Indian negotiations. Essowakkeny, the Comanche. incident with General Johnston. the talk. their treachery. treaty. Indian cannibals. ust returned from the Hermitage, where I spent all last week, and have had many and long conversations with the old chief in relation to the next campaign. He will be pleased to see you, if you can make it convenient to pass this way. Hon. Henry D. Gilpin, the Attorney-General, and a confidential friend of President Van Buren, had married the widow of Senator Johnston. He wrote to General Johnston, August 13th, kindly urging him to visit him at Washington. He says: It is very evident the