Browsing named entities in John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Girardey or search for Girardey in all documents.

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ommand of Colonel Walton, of the Washington artillery, marched on board the steamer Natchez, already chartered for the expedition by Maj.-Gen. J. L. Lewis. This force, intended for Baton Rouge, was composed of the following commands: The Crescent Rifles, Lieut. N. A. Metcalf, 49 men; Washington Artillery, Lieut.-Col. Voorhees, 56 men; Second company Chasseurs-a-pied, Maj. Bernard Avegno, 36 men; Orleans Cadets, Capt. Chas. D. Dreux, 39 men; Louisiana Guards, Capt. S. M. Todd, 41 men, Lieutenant Girardey commanding; Sarsfield Guards, Captain O'Hara, 16 men; Louisiana Grays, Capt W. C. Deane, 13 men. Total, 250. January 10th, the following companies, joking at their confined limits, left on board the towboat Yantic, the forts below the city being the objective point: Orleans battalion artillery (two companies), Captains Hebrard and Gomez, 57 men; First company Chasseurs-a-pied, Captain St. Paul, 44 men; Chasseurs d'orleans, Captain Hendolve, 15 men; the Jaegers (German), Captain Pe
he cause of his adopted State and entered the army as colonel of the First Louisiana infantry. He served with his regiment at Norfolk, Va., and in May, 1861, was in command of one of the two divisions of Huger's forces. With promotion to brigadier-general he commanded a brigade at Portsmouth, Va., consisting of the Third, Fourth and Twenty-second Georgia regiments of infantry, the Third Alabama infantry, the Third Louisiana infantry, Colonel Williams' North Carolina battalion of infantry, Girardey's Louisiana Guard artillery, and the Sussex cavalry. In April, 1862, he supported Colonel Wright in the operations about South Mills. In June, 1862, Gen. A. R. Wright took command of the brigade, and on account of his advanced age General Blanchard was not longer actively engaged. He was for a while in command at Drewry's bluff, afterward in North Carolina. After the war he returned to New Orleans and was surveyor and civil engineer from 1866 until 1870. He was deputy surveyor of the c