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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 15 5 Browse Search
Lt.-Colonel Arthur J. Fremantle, Three Months in the Southern States 14 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 6 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 2 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 7 1 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion 6 4 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Gist or search for Gist in all documents.

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all the planting region which received the news, and the movement to take the arsenal was immediately set on foot. The Yell Rifles, of which that most distinguished officer, Patrick R. Cleburne, was a member, and a company of cavalry under Captain Gist, brother of Governor Gist of South Carolina, came overland, mounted and armed; the Phillips Guards, an infantry company commanded by Captain Otey, came by steamer up the Arkansas river. Several impromptu organizations came by steamer from PinGovernor Gist of South Carolina, came overland, mounted and armed; the Phillips Guards, an infantry company commanded by Captain Otey, came by steamer up the Arkansas river. Several impromptu organizations came by steamer from Pine Bluff, and others by land on horseback. Soon there were several thousand men in Little Rock, assembled for the purpose of demanding the surrender of the arsenal and taking possession of the arms and munitions there stored. The inhabitants of the little city were in a state of most intense excitement. The arsenal was situated in a grove of twenty acres, and consisted of a large two-story brick building, with octagonal tower, in which were stores of arms and munitions of war; a handsome b
Cleburne did not reach the parapet, but fell just outside. The army could not stand the unequal fight. It drew off to move against some other point of attack. Schofield moved out as soon as it was dark, and by midnight had his army mainly at Nashville. General Hood took possession of the Federal works, but it was after his own army had suffered terribly and the enemy had escaped. Hood's loss was estimated at 5,000 or 6,000. He had lost some of his best generals. Cleburne of Arkansas, Gist of South Carolina, Adams of Tennessee, Strahl of Tennessee, and Granbury of Texas, were killed; John C. Brown, Quarles, Cockrell, Manigault, Scott and Carter were wounded, and G. W. Gordon captured. The general officers riding behind .their men or in line with them were shining marks for the deadly rifles aimed from a rest behind breastworks. Cleburne was killed in a charge at double-quick. His horse was first killed under him, and he pressed forward with his men on foot, when he was kil