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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 35 7 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 1, 1862., [Electronic resource] 13 11 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 11 1 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 3 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Ernest Crosby, Garrison the non-resistant 5 5 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 8, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters. You can also browse the collection for Gladstone or search for Gladstone in all documents.

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nt, a century and a quarter earlier than Rousseau's Contrat social, and it precedes by one hundred and thirty-eight years the American Declaration of Independence. But the slightest acquaintance with colonial writings will reveal the fact that such political radicalism as Thomas Hooker's was accompanied by an equally striking conservatism in other directions. One of these conservative traits was the pioneer's respect for property, and particularly for the land cleared by his own toil. Gladstone once spoke of possession of the soil as the most important and most operative of all social facts. Free-footed as the pioneer colonist was, he was disinclined to part with his land without a substantial price for it. The land at his disposal was practically illimitable, but he showed a very English tenacity in safeguarding his hold upon his own portion. Very English, likewise, was his attachment to the old country as home. The lighter and the more serious writings of the colonists ar