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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 35 7 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 1, 1862., [Electronic resource] 13 11 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 11 1 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 3 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
Ernest Crosby, Garrison the non-resistant 5 5 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 8, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 18, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Gladstone or search for Gladstone in all documents.

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, and in 1854 at a little above three per cent. The Americans, however, began by an offer of seven per cent., and are at this moment compelled to pay ten or twelve per cent.--We find, therefore, that while $300,000,000 annually would be added to their national debt, $30,000,000 annually would be added to the charge of that debt, so that four years and three-quarters of their present expenditure would saddle them with a burthen equal to that which we have incurred in decentury and a half. Mr. Gladstone has to provide some $115,000,000 to satisfy the public creditors of Great Britain. In the year 1866, if the American war should be protracted so long, Mr. Chase's successor will have to provide rather more than that sum for the creditors of the Union." The Times contains a subsequent article, which concludes with the declaration that, if the North should attempt to defray the cumulating charges of the debt and of the war with money borrowed at these exorbitant rates of interest, t