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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.18 (search)
ering to this taste by a part of the Press. It is to be remembered, too, that the circumstances of his early life heightened his sensitiveness to gossiping curiosity and crude misrepresentation. And, finally, he had in his nature much of the woman, the Ewigweibliche; he craved fame far less than love and confidence. Renown, as it came, he accepted, not with indifference,--he was too human for that,--but with tempered satisfaction. He met praise in the fine phrase Morley quotes from Gladstone, as one meets a cooling breeze, enjoyed, but not detained. The pain which slander brought he turned to account, setting it as a lesson to himself not to misjudge others. His thoughts upon his own experience may be sufficiently shewn by an extract from one of his Note-books. The vulgar, even hideous, nonsense, the number and variety of untruths published about me, from this time forth taught me, from pure sympathy, reflection, and conviction, to modify my judgement about others. Whe
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.23 (search)
to me. At the house of my dear wife-to-be, I met the ex-Premier, the Right Honourable Mr. W. E. Gladstone, who had come for a chat and a cup of tea, and to be instructed — as I had been duly warnthe table before the great man, at whose speaking face I gazed with the eyes of an African. Mr. Gladstone, said I, intending to be brief and to the point, as he was an old man, this is Mombasa, the s twin harbours, in which the whole British Navy might lie safely, and-- Pardon me, said Mr. Gladstone, did you say it was a harbour? Yes, sir, said I, so large that a thousand vessels could ic names like those should be displaced by modern names, and-- I humbly beg your pardon, Mr. Gladstone, but Crophi and Mophi, if they ever existed at all, were situated over a thousand miles to tnorthward. Herodotus simply wrote from hearsay, and-- Oh, I can't stand that. Well, Mr. Gladstone, said I, will you assist me in this project of a railway to Uganda, for the suppression of t
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.24 (search)
ssible places, in an island, or in the air, only certain articles of food and comfort being indispensable. Then let me wake to strains of music, and I think I should rise to life again! Until then, existence is mere prolonged endurance. Stanley all his life had a passion for reading, when he could not be doing. He delighted in reading Caesar, Thucydides, Xenophon, Polybius, and lighter books also did not come amiss. From Cheltenham, he wrote:-- I have begun again on Thucydides. Gladstone's Gleanings are ended. They are all good. Strange! how I detect the church-going, God-fearing, conscientious Christian, in almost every paragraph. Julian Corbett's Drake is fair; I am glad I read it, and refreshed myself with what I knew before of the famous sailor. From the Bell Hotel, Gloucester, he wrote, June 3, 1891:-- I had a long walk into the country, which is simply buried under bushy green of grass and leaves. I saw the largest river in England yesterday: it appears
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.27 (search)
Englishman and Boer, has yielded to him, the adulation paid to him for his success, one cannot wonder that he believes that in this matter of the Uitlander's rights, as in the things that went before, his methods, his style, and his way are the best and safest! This has begotten in him an arrogance so large that, before he can be made sensible that he is wrong, his fierce pride must be humbled; his head has grown so big with this vain belief in his prowess in battle. His victories over Gladstone, Lord Salisbury, and others of the same calibre, the implicit trust of the Boers in him, and in his unconquerability, have been such, that, I am convinced, there is no room in that brain for one grain of common-sense to be injected into it. His whole behaviour seems to say very clearly to the observer, What do I care for your Chamberlain, with his Milners and Greens? They shall yield to me first. I don't care a snap of the finger for them; let them do their worst; better men than they
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Notes on African travel, etc. (search)
uld have been no danger of starvation, as I should have turned all undesirables out. Then, as a last resource, there was the Nile. My one idea would have been to carry out what I had undertaken to do, without any outside help. If I had gone to Khartoum to rescue the garrison, the garrison would have been rescued! When Gordon started, this is what he undertook to do; there was no thought, or question, of sending a rescue expedition. It was failure all round — Gordon failed first, then Gladstone and the Government. But I have refrained from all public expression of opinion, because it is not permitted in England to criticise Gordon; and, besides, he was a true hero, and he died nobly. That silences one: nevertheless, I hold that Gordon need not have died! Henry Morton Stanley large shall his name be writ, with that strong line, Of heroes, martyrs, soldiers, saints, who gave Their lives to chart the waste, and free the slave, In the dim Continent where his beacons shine.
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
, 506-514. Galton, Sir, Francis, 286, 287. Garstin, Sir, William, on the importance of Stanley's discoveries, 404, 405. Genealogy, 3. Generalship, American, fault of, 178. Germany, in East Africa, 422. Ghost stories, 8, 9. Gladstone, W. E., Stanley's interview with, 419-421; as a speaker, 479, 480. Goff, Mr., 65. Gordon, General, Stanley's view of character of, 338, 526; massacre of, 353; Stanley on death of, 396, 397, 537, 538. Goree, Dr. and Dan, 160, 162, 165, 169, 1411, 412; goes to Brussels and is received by the King of Belgium, 412; Grand Crosses conferred on him, 412; discusses African affairs with the King of Belgium, 413-417; arrives in England, 418; his reception in England, 419; his interview with Gladstone, 419-421; his refutation of the charge that he used slaves, 421, 422; In Darkest Africa published, 422; stirs up societies to see that Germany does not absorb too much of East Africa, 422; married, 423; meets Sir Richard F. Burton in the Engadi