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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
n upon their door sills, called into their gardens upon pretended business, butchered and left lying, that their families might not know their whereabouts uutil their bodies were decomposed. Women were ravished, houses burned, plantations laid waste. Judge Richardson was shot whilst in the courthouse in which he presided, in Scotland county. Rev. Wm. Headlee, a minister of the gospel, was shot upon the highway; and all of these murderers, robbers and incendiaries, are yet a large. Dr. Glasscock, a physician, was dragged from his own house by soldiers, under pretence of taking him to court as a witness, against the earnest prayers of his children and slaves, was shot, mangled, disfigured and mutilated, then brought to his own yard and thrown down like a dead animal. To prevent punishment by law, these criminals repealed the laws against their crimes; and provided in the constitution that crime should go unpunished if committed by themselves. To make themselves secure in th
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--full report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
under the command of its noble Brigadier, who, writhing under a painful attack of inflammatory rheumatism, nevertheless kept with his command until now. At one o'clock at night the brigades, with noiseless march, moved out. This precaution was necessary on account of the enemy's having possession of Bull Run mountain, which in the daytime commanded a view of every movement of consequence in that region. Hancock's corps occupied Thoroughfare gap. Moving to the right we passed through Glasscock's gap, without serious difficulty, and marched for Haymarket. I had previously sent Major Mosby, with some picked men, through to gain the vicinity of Dranesville, find where a crossing was practicable, and bring intelligence to me near Gum Spring to-day (25th). As we neared Haymarket we found that Hancock's corps was en route through Haymarket for Gum Spring, his infantry well distributed through his trains. I chose a good position and opened with artillery with effect on his passing
ets them on the body of the safe, with or without an interior plate. Also fire-proofing with alum and non-conducting materials. Hill, 1865, and Hodgson, 1865. Sliding doors of peculiar form to resist the operations of burglars. Loysel, 1865. A protecting wall, revolving or sliding, is placed between inner and outer cylinders or plates; the inner one contains the door, to which access is had by pushing aside the protecting wall when its bolts are released. Parrish, Thatcher, and Glasscock, 1865. Forming a series of dovetail projections on the door frame, which fit corresponding mortises in the door to prevent its being forced open by wedges. Other modifications of this principle, in the form of serrations or undulations in the door and its casing, have since been embraced in various patents. Another method is to form a bead around the door, fitting a groove in the casing. Besides this, various special arrangements have been adopted to prevent the entrance of wedges.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.16 (search)
e in Fort Gregg, and assisted in its defense: Captain A. K. Jones, Corporal H. K. Fuller, H. M. Colson, W. W. Coutch, H. W. Porter, J. H. Roberts, A. J. Sevier, G. W. H. Shaifer, J. H. Simms, W. R. Thompson, and Pearson Wells. W. D. Brown was wounded before we got into the fort, and did not enter, but went on to the rear. John H. Roberts was shot some minutes after the capture of the fort, as many of our men were. For some time the Natchez Fencibles, Company G, were attached to Company K, and both regarded as one company. There were of the Natchez Fencibles present in Fort Gregg: Lieutenant Glasscock, Sergeant Barlow, Sergeant Lecand, Corporal Murray, Naftel Underwood, Joseph Vandyke, and West. O'Brien and Podesta were wounded in front of the fort, and did not enter it. James Vandyke was wounded in the fort, and got out and went to the rear before the assault was made. King was on the front line. If he was in the fort he was killed. He was not with us a prisoner.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.66 (search)
sland, 1861. Geiman, Jess C. (Ord. Sergt.), lives at Bloomfield, Va. Gibson, Gurley, still living in Alabama. Glasscock, Robt., died since the war. Grigsby, Bushrod, died since the war. Glasscock, Samuel, died since the war. GlassGlasscock, Samuel, died since the war. Glasscock, Alfred (Third Lieut.), died since the war. Glasscock, Thomas, still living at Paris, Va. Garrison, Bushrod, lost a foot in threshing machine, and died since the war. Garrison, Tip, died since the war; was wounded at Kelley's Island. Glasscock, Alfred (Third Lieut.), died since the war. Glasscock, Thomas, still living at Paris, Va. Garrison, Bushrod, lost a foot in threshing machine, and died since the war. Garrison, Tip, died since the war; was wounded at Kelley's Island. Grigsby, Nat, wounded at Upperville, Va., June 27, 1863, and died. Gilmore, Howard, lost sight of as joined other commands. Gilmore, Harry, lost sight of as joined other commands. Gilmore, Dick, lost sight of as joined other commands. Glasscock, Thomas, still living at Paris, Va. Garrison, Bushrod, lost a foot in threshing machine, and died since the war. Garrison, Tip, died since the war; was wounded at Kelley's Island. Grigsby, Nat, wounded at Upperville, Va., June 27, 1863, and died. Gilmore, Howard, lost sight of as joined other commands. Gilmore, Harry, lost sight of as joined other commands. Gilmore, Dick, lost sight of as joined other commands. Holmes, Chas., killed at Greenland Gap, W. Va. Hitt, blacksmith for the company, lost sight of (dead). Harman, Dr., died since the war at Hamilton, Va. Harrison, Daniel B., wounded several times, but still living near Marshall (dead now).
ed, of the force heretofore lying on the Maryland shore opposite our Evansport batteries. As several of these regiments passed farmhouses, they stopped and helped themselves. At Mr. George Conway's they broke every lock about the place — the farm being under the management of two servants that remained — ate the meat Mr. C. had left for the servants during the summer — and took what ever they wanted, but it seems did not engage in any merely wanton destruction of property. At Mr. Glasscock's they wanted to borrow or hire a horse, but being refused they took him, promising to return him. They asked Mr. G. if he had not suffered from our regiments that had quartered near him all the winter. He said that to some extent he had. "Would you not rather have our regiment here?" said one of the party. "That," said Mr. G, "I regard as hardly a fair question." The Colonel of the regiment responded that it was not. From the Potomac below Aquia Creek. A note from an entirely r<
Runaway --$200 Reward.--Ran away from my farm, Morton Hill, two miles below Richmond, two stout black negro men, Henry and Dick. Henry was raised in Fauquier, near Rector Town; and Dick is Louisa. Henry, when spoken to, has little to say. Dick talks very freely. Their ages are between 25 and 30 years. Henry formerly belonged to a Mr. Glasscock, Fauquier co, and Dick to a Mr. Harris, in Louisa county. W A Hoppe. oc 1--6t
Runaway--$200 reward. --Ran away from my farm, Marion Hill, two miles below Richmond, two stout black negro men, Henry and Dick. Henry was raised in Fauquier, near Rector Town; and Dick in Louisa. Henry, when spoken to, has little to say. Dick talks very freely. Their ages are between 25 and 30 years. Henry formerly belonged to a Mr. Glasscock, Fauquier co, and Dick to a Mr. Harris, in Louisa county. W A Hopte. oc 1--6t
Runaway--$200 reward. --Ran away from my farm, Marion Hill, two miles below Richmond, two stout black negro men, Henry and Dick. Henry was raised in Fauquier, near Rector Town; and Dick in Louisa. Henry, when spoken to, has little to say. Dick talks very freely. Their ages are between 26 and 30 years. Henry formerly belonged to a Mr. Glasscock, Fauquier Co., and Dick to a Mr. Harris, in Louisa county. W A Hople. oc 1--6t
Runaway--$200 reward. --Ran away from my farm, Marion Hill, two miles below Richmond, two stout black negro men, Henry and Dick. Henry was raised in Fauquier, near Rector Town, and Dick in Louisa. Henry, when spoken to, has little to say. Dick talks very freely. Their ages are between 25 and 30 years. Henry formerly belonged to a Mr. Glasscock, Fauquier co, and Dick to a Mr. Harris, in Louisa county. W. A. Hoppe. oc 21--6t
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