Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Glen or search for Glen in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 15: mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord 1908-1910; aet. 89-91 (search)
sorbed and reverent interest. These are Boston memories, but those of Oak Glen are no less tender and vivid. There, too, the meals were festivals, the midday dinner being now the chief one, with its following hour on the piazza; Grandmother in her hooded chair, with her cross-stitch embroidery or hooked rug, daughters and grandchildren gathered round her. Horace and Xenophon were on the little table beside her, but they must wait till she had mixed and enjoyed her social salad. At Oak Glen, too, she had her novel and her whist, bezique or dominoes, as the family was larger or smaller. She never stooped to solitaire; a game must be an affair of companionship, of the social tie in defence of which Broa Sam, in his youth, had professed himself ready to die. Instead of the Victor concert, she now made music herself, playing fourhand pieces with Florence, the music daughter, trained in childhood by Otto Dresel. This was another great pleasure. (Did any one, we wonder, ever enjoy