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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Glies or search for Glies in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
dge to the shelter of the earth-works, and the battery had to begin firing. Dent's battery was soon withdrawn, as the men were shot down as fast as they took position beside their guns. Rowan's battery now became exposed to a raking fire from the left. The first section, under Lieutenant Ritter was on the left, and was consequently the most severely handled. Under a fire of almost unprecedented intensity, his two guns were speedily silenced, and not long after the other two, under Lieutenant Glies. At the right gun of Ritter's section eight men were killed and wounded within a few minutes, leaving but three at the gun. Among the killed was Corporal Sanchez, a Spaniard, long resident in Mexico, where he had commanded a company under Santa Anna during our war with that country. He was a man of fine military education, and an accomplished linguist. When number four at the gun was shot down, Sanchez was ordered to fire the piece, but was at that moment struck by the fragment o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Third battery of Maryland Artillery. (search)
dge to the shelter of the earth-works, and the battery had to begin firing. Dent's battery was soon withdrawn, as the men were shot down as fast as they took position beside their guns. Rowan's battery now became exposed to a raking fire from the left. The first section, under Lieutenant Ritter was on the left, and was consequently the most severely handled. Under a fire of almost unprecedented intensity, his two guns were speedily silenced, and not long after the other two, under Lieutenant Glies. At the right gun of Ritter's section eight men were killed and wounded within a few minutes, leaving but three at the gun. Among the killed was Corporal Sanchez, a Spaniard, long resident in Mexico, where he had commanded a company under Santa Anna during our war with that country. He was a man of fine military education, and an accomplished linguist. When number four at the gun was shot down, Sanchez was ordered to fire the piece, but was at that moment struck by the fragment o