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Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 138 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 38 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 34 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 30 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 22 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 20 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 18 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 18 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 16 0 Browse Search
Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America. 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Goethe or search for Goethe in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 16: Webster (search)
se, let it rise till it meet the sun in his coming; let the earliest light of morning gild it, and parting day linger and play on its summit. Here the thought is nothing, the style everything. No one can repeat those words and be deaf to their music or insensible to the rhythm and beauty of the prose with the Saxon words relieved just sufficiently by the Latin derivatives. The ease with which it is done may be due to training, but the ability to do it comes from natural gifts which, as Goethe says, we value more as we get older because they can not be stuck on. Possibly to some people it may seem very simple to utter such a sentence. One can only repeat what Scott says somewhere about Swift's style, perhaps the purest and strongest we have in the language. Swift's style, said Scott, seems so simple that one would think any child might write as he does, and yet if we try we find to our despair that it is impossible. It is not easy to say how much Webster's literary art was d
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 18: Prescott and Motley (search)
r in his moments of relaxation, a few of his intimate letters to the American having been published among those of Motley. Most delightful are the young student's own letters home during his Wanderjahre. He worked hard, indeed, at law in both universities, but it was the glimpses of Europe and the human side of its life, both past and present, that were the really vital part of the educational results for the young American. Intellectual Germany was still palpitating with the influence of Goethe, whom he was just too late to see, and he was deeply impressed by the atmosphere. He met scholars, such as Tieck, then at work on his translation of Shakespeare, and he learned what minute research could be. At the same time Motley retained an impressionistic attitude towards history which was wholly un-German. He always saw the past instinct with life. He is constantly reconstructing. If you will allow me to mount my hobby, as Tristram Shandy would say, he writes from Rome in 1834, and
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 22: divines and moralists, 1783-1860 (search)
me grounds as those upon which he condemned Plato himself. Anti-Platonism is the key to Norton's position. Norton's teaching is praised by his disciple William Henry Furness (1802-96), who carried it to the First Unitarian Church in Philadelphia; and it must, in fact, have been a powerful stimulus to anyone who could taste his austerity and his intellectual keenness. He is not wholly free from banalities, those devils that stand ever ready at the clerical elbow; he prefers Mrs. Stowe to Goethe; but the great body of his work is ascetically pure in taste as in style. It can still be read with pleasure, indeed with a certain intellectual thrill. The work of enfranchisement was carried on in their several modes by three notable contemporaries: Horace Bushnell (1802-76), Henry Ward Beecher (1813-87), and Mark Hopkins (1802-87), each in his way a liberator. Superficially, Bushnell may seem to have been a reactionary. Born in Litchfield Township, Connecticut, he graduated at Yal
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
81 Gibbons vs. Ogden, 75, 93 n. Gift, the, 174 Gift of Friendship, the, 174 Gift of Friendship, a Token of Remembrance for 1848, The, 171, 174 Gilchrist, Anne, 271, 272, 272 n., 273 Giles Cory of the Salem farms, 39 Give Me Your hand, Johnny bull, 286 Gladstone, 224, 314, 320 God in Christ, 212 Globe (Washington), The, 183 God save the South, 305 Godey, Louis A., 60, 168 Godey's lady's Book, 164, 168, 371 God's acre, 36 Godwin, William, 197, 205 Goethe, 102, 133, 211 Goff (Regicide), 202 Gold Bug, the, 59, 68, 351, 371 Golden legend, the, 37, 38, 39 Goldsmith, 96, 148, 225, 234, 237, 349, 368 Gomara, 129 Gooch, C. P., 128 Good-bye, My Lover, Good-bye, 408 Good Gray poet, the, 270 Goodrich, Samuel Griswold, 19, 154, 173, 399, 403, 404, 405, 406 Goose pond School, the, 389 Gordon, John Brown, 318, 320 Gordon, Rev., William, 104 Gottingen, 33, 110, 112, 133 Gould, Judge, 215 Goulding, F. R., 403 G