Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition.. You can also browse the collection for A. Golden or search for A. Golden in all documents.

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has brought into my possession papers, or copies of papers, from very many of the distinguished men of the country in every colony. Among those who have rendered me most valuable aid in this respect, I must name in an especial manner the late Mr. Golden of New-York, who intrusted to me all the manuscripts of Lieutenant Governor Golden, covering a period in New-York history of nearly a quarter of a century; the late Mr. Johnson of Stratford, Connecticut, who put into my hands those of hi fatherLieutenant Governor Golden, covering a period in New-York history of nearly a quarter of a century; the late Mr. Johnson of Stratford, Connecticut, who put into my hands those of hi father, containing excellent contributions alike to English and American history; my friend Dr. Potter, the present Bishop of Pennsylvania, who furnished me numerous papers of equal interest and novelty, illustrating the history of New-York and of the Union; Mr. Force of Washington City, whose success in collecting materials for American History is exceeded only by his honest love of historic truth; Mr. J. F. Eliot of Boston; Mr. William B. Reed, Mr. Langdon Elwyn, and Mr. Edward D. Ingraham of Philad
be burnt as soon as landed, and I am ready to peril my life in the attempt. Such were the words of Isaac Sears at a public meeting of the resolute patriots. The decision was on the balance; an appeal was again taken to the people; and as it appeared that a majority favored resuming importations, the packet of July which had been detained for a few days, sailed before the middle of the month with orders for all kinds of merchandise excepting tea. Golden to Hillsborough, 10 July, 1770; A. Golden to A. Todd, 11 July, 1770; James Duane to W. S. Johnson, 9 Dec. 1770. Send us your old Liberty Pole, as you can have no further use for it, A Card from the Inhabitants of Philadelphia, &c. July, 1770. said the Philadelphians. The students at Princeton burnt the New-York merchants' letter by the hands of the hangman. Boston tore it into pieces and threw it to the winds. Votes at a full Meeting of the Trade at Faneuil Hall, 24 July, 1770. South Carolina, whose patriots had just raise