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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 12 8 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 11 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 27, 1862., [Electronic resource] 7 7 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 13, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 18, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address before the Mecklenburg (N. C.) Historical Society. (search)
Tennessee to the Union and gave a death-blow to the Confederacy. Andy Johnson refused to give up Nashville, as Buell directed, when Bragg advanced into Kentucky. The abandonment of Nashville then would have given the whole State over to the Confederacy. These two men — Thomas and Johnson — dug the grave of the Confederacy. Farragut, of Tennessee, rose to the highest rank in the Federal navy, for his triumphs over his native land. The naval forces at Hatteras were under command of Goldsborough, of Maryland. It is a singular fact that the Southern men in the Federal service were remarkably successful, while the Northern men in our service, though brave and true, brought disaster to our arms. Lovel lost us New Orleans, Pemberton lost us Vicksburg, and Gardner lost us Port Hudson. Through the failure of these three officers the command of the Mississippi was lost, the Confederacy was cut in twain, and the conquest of the South became only a question of time. Had the South be
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence, Chapter 23: (search)
ly-bought one on our side, and numbers of those who but a few days before had gaily attended the review, were now stretched cold and lifeless on the same ground. Among those whose death we mourned, was the gallant Colonel Hampton of the 2d South Carolina, brother of General Hampton, and Colonel Williams of the 2d North Carolina; General William Lee, Colonel Butler, and many other officers of rank, were among the wounded. Our Staff had suffered very severely: Captain White wounded, Lieutenant Goldsborough taken prisoner, and the gallant Captain Farley killed. Poor Farley! after innumerable escapes from the perils into which his brilliant gallantry led him, his fate had overtaken him at last, and he died as heroically as he had lived. While riding towards the enemy, side by side with Colonel Butler, a shell which passed clean through their horses, killed both these, shattered at the same time one of Butler's legs below the knee, and carried off one of Farley's close up to the body
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 22: capture of Winchester. (search)
y of his infantry from Bower's Hill to the town, leaving only a body of skirmishers confronting us. Very early on the morning of the 14th, I ordered Hays and Gordon to advance each a regiment across the creek to drive the enemy's skirmishers from Bower's Hill, which was done after some sharp skirmishing. At the same time Smith's skirmishers were advanced across the creek on the left, and we got possession of the works on the hill. While these operations were going on at Bower's Hill, Major Goldsborough, with the skirmishers of the Maryland battalion, advanced on the right into the outskirts of Winchester, but fearing that the enemy, whose principal force had taken position in and near the main fort, might shell the town, I ordered him to retire. General Ewell came up immediately after my skirmishers had advanced to Bower's Hill, and together we proceeded to reconnoitre from that point, from which we had a very distinct view of the works about Winchester. We discovered that the
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
62, 388, 390, 393, 468 Germana Ford, 317, 319, 324, 325, 344, 346 Germantown, 40 Gettysburg, 254-58,264, 266,267,271, 272, 275, 276, 278, 279, 282, 286- 288, 290, 478 Gibbon, General (U. S. A.), 198, 206, 209, 225 Gibson, Captain, 28 Gibson, Colonel, 153 Gilmor, Major H., 333-34, 338, 340, 383, 394, 460 Gilmore, General (U. S. A.), 393 Gloucester Point, 59, 61 Godwin, Colonel, 249, 274-75, 311- 314 Godwin, General, 423, 427 Goggin, Major, 449, 451 Goldsborough, Major, 243 Goodwin, Colonel, 385 Gordon, General J. B., 192, 209-11, 221-25,227,229,230,232-33,239, 240,242-44,246,248-250,252-53, 256-263, 267-275, 280, 305, 311, 245-351, 359, 363, 372, 374, 381, 384-85, 388, 392, 396, 403, 406, 408-09,414,419-23,425,429,434, 438-444, 446, 448, 452 Gordonsville, 74-75, 92, 104-05, 237, 340, 343-44, 359, 451, 458, 464, 465 Gosport Navy Yard, 1 Government at Richmond, 44, 45, 46, 89, 157, 160, 290, 297 Government at Washington, 89, 157 G
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 8: commands the army defending Richmond, and seven days battles. (search)
ll, says he looks upon the day as decisive of the war, and tells him to try and drive the rascals, and take some prisoners and guns. This was an hour or two before Porter's defeat. General Hooker did not seem to be so confident, for about the same time he reported that he had just returned from the front, where we have nothing but a stampede, owing to the behavior of the troops occupying the picket line. The first shot from a rebel was sufficient to start regiments. Later that day Admiral Goldsborough, the flag officer of the Federal squadron on the James, was notified by Mc-Clellan that he had met with a severe repulse, and asked him to send gunboats up the James River to cover the left flank of his army. The Washington War Secretary was confident of Federal success as late as the evening of June 29th, for he telegraphed Hon. William H. Seward, at New York, that his inference is, from what has taken place around Richmond, that McClellan will be in the city within two days; an
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 15: evacuation of Richmond and the Petersburg lines.--retreat and surrender. (search)
ouse until noon that day. Still, if Lee's supplies had been there as ordered, he might have moved against Sheridan at Jetersville very early on the 5th with his whole force except Ewell, over twenty thousand men, and defeated him and reached Burkeville, thirteen miles farther, before Ord, who arrived there late that night. Had Lee once passed beyond Burkeville, the Danville road could have supplied his army, its trains transported them to Danville, and via Greensborough to Raleigh and Goldsborough, or wherever Johnston was, or Johnston's force could have been rapidly brought to the Army of Northern Virginia. Not finding the supplies ordered to be placed at Amelia Court House, says Lee, nearly twenty-four hours were lost in endeavoring to collect in the country subsistence for men and horses. The delay was fatal, and could not be retrieved. There is some mystery about these supplies. Lee ordered them to be sent there from Danville, for he has so stated; and General J. M. St. John
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Chapter 12: the negro as a soldier. (search)
Chapter 12: the negro as a soldier. There was in our regiment a very young recruit, named Sam Roberts, of whom Trowbridge used to tell this story. Early in the war Trowbridge had been once sent to Amelia Island with a squad of men, under direction of Commodore Goldsborough, to remove the negroes from the island. As the officers stood on the beach, talking to some of the older freedmen, they saw this urchin peeping at them from front and rear in a scrutinizing way, for which his father at last called him to account, as thus:-- Hi! Sammy, what you's doin‘, chile? Daddy, said the inquisitive youth, don't you know mas'r tell us Yankee hab tail? I don't see no tail, daddy! There were many who went to Port Royal during the war, in civil or military positions, whose previous impressions of the colored race were about as intelligent as Sam's view of themselves. But, for one, I had always had so much to do with fugitive slaves, and had studied the whole subject with such inte
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Appendix B: the First black soldiers. (search)
banded, except one company That company, under command of Sergeant Trowbridge, then acting as Captain, but not commissioned, was kept in service, and was sent (August 5, 1862) to garrison St. Simon's Island, on the coast of Georgia. On this island (made famous by Mrs. Kemble's description) there were then five hundred colored people, and not a single white man. The black soldiers were sent down on the Ben De Ford, Captain Hallett. On arriving, Trowbridge was at once informed by Commodore Goldsborough, naval commander at that station, that there was a party of rebel guerillas on the island, and was asked whether he would trust his soldiers in pursuit of them. Trowbridge gladly assented; and the Commodore added, If you should capture them, it will be a great thing for you. They accordingly went on shore, and found that the colored men of the island had already undertaken the enterprise. Twenty-five of them had armed themselves, under the command of one of their own number, who
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Army Life in a Black Regiment, Index. (search)
rge, Capt., 179, 270. Doolittle, J. R., Hon., 285. Duncan, Lt. Comr., 160, 103. Dupont, S. F., Admiral, 67,78, 89,100, 135. Dutch, Capt., 170. Fessenden, W. P., Hon., 285, 287. Finnegan, Gen., 108. Fisher, J., Lt., 271. Fowler, J. H., Chap.,40, 113, 231, 270. Fremont, J. C., Gen., 23, 42. French, J., Rev., 40, 118. Furman, J. T., Lt., 272. Gage, F. D., Mrs., 41. Garrison, W. L., 249. Gaston, William, Lt., 271. Gillmore, Q. A., Gen., 167, 168, 183, 235,237, 240. Goldsborough, Commodore, 243, 274. Goodell, J. B., Lt., 2. Goodrich, F. S., Lt., 271, 272. Gould, E., Corp., 274. Gould, F. M., Lt., 272. Greene, Sergt., 121. Hallett, Capt., 65, 66, 274. Hallowell, E. N., Gen., 225, 242, 244 Hartwell A. S., Gen., 286. Hawks, J. M., Surg., 269. Hawley, J. R., Gen., 81, 93, 107. Hayne, H. E., Sergt., 265. Hazard, Miles, 275. Heasley, A., Capt., 230, 270. Heron, Charles, 122. Hinton, R. J., Col., 277. Holden, Lt., 122. Hooper, C. W., Capt., 155, 237, 270,
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, Lxviii. (search)
l I get to it! And, added Mr. Lincoln, I am not going to worry myself over the slavery question till I get to it. General Garfield, of Ohio, received from the President an account of the capture of Norfolk, similar to that recorded on a previous page, with the following preface:-- By the way, Garfield, said Mr. Lincoln, you never heard, did you, that Chase, Stanton, and I, had a campaign of our own? We went down to Fortress Monroe in Chase's revenue cutter, and consulted with Admiral Goldsborough as to the feasibility of taking Norfolk by landing on the north shore and making a march of eight miles. The Admiral said, very positively, there was no landing on that shore, and we should have to double the cape and approach the place from the south side, which would be a long and difficult journey. I thereupon asked him if he had ever tried to find a landing, and he replied that he had not. Now, said I, Admiral, that reminds me of a chap out West who had studied law, but had neve
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