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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 12 8 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 12 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 11 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 4 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 27, 1862., [Electronic resource] 7 7 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 13, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 18, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Goldsborough or search for Goldsborough in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The blockade (search)
reflects as much honor upon it as its more brilliant feats of arms. Before the blockade was six months old, the Atlantic Squadron was divided in two. Flag-Officer Goldsborough Admiral Samuel Phillips Lee. When the war broke out, Samuel Phillips Lee, who was born in Virginia in 1811, had already seen twenty-six years of bases but had entered wedges into the very vitals of the Confederacy. After holding the command of the North Atlantic Squadron for little short of a year, Admiral Goldsborough was relieved by Admiral Lee, who was, two years later, relieved in turn by Admiral Porter. The latter's command was brief but full of stirring events and Commodore Gershom J. Van Brunt, U. S. N. The gallant commander of the Minnesota. He and his ship were early in the thick of things and served under Rear-Admiral Goldsborough at Hatteras Inlet. Made commodore July 16, 1862, Van Brunt was actively engaged in blockade duty during the rest of the war. Rear-Admiral James L. La
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The birth of the ironclads (search)
adnock and the Miantonomoh, the final types, could reach the then wonderful speed of eleven knots, and they proved their seaworthy qualities by riding out gales off the capes, holding to their anchorage when many large vessels and transports had been forced to cut and run. Toward the end of the war, the various flag-officers who had had, in some cases, ironclads under their command made reports to the United States Navy Department after close observance of these vessels in action. Admiral Goldsborough wrote, in February, 1864, a report in which he says: Every ironclad, as a matter of course, should be an unexceptionable ram, or, in other words, capable herself of being used as a projectile. She must be turned with every degree of quickness necessary. . . . The turret I regard as decidedly preferable (to broadside) and mainly for these reasons: it renders one gun of a class equivalent to at least two of the same disposed in opposite broadside ports, and this with a great reduct
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval actions along the shore (search)
gun-captains are at their places and the crews with training lines in hand await the order from the officers above to aim and fire. Many times was this scene repeated aboard the Commodore Perry after she sailed with the motley fleet that Admiral Goldsborough led against Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds in January, 1862. In addition to her four 9-inch smooth-bores, the Perry carried a 12-pounder rifle and a 100-pounder rifle, it being the policy to equip the light-draft gunboats with the heaviest Jouett, of the frigate Santee, took and destroyed the privateer Royal Yacht in Galveston Harbor, in November. Many were the gallant acts of the enlisted men and petty officers in the fighting along the shore. In the expedition under Flag-Officer Goldsborough against Roanoke Island, in February, 1862, there were two brave little fights between the Hearts of oak in wooden ships a fleet of Federal vessels riding out a storm in Hampton roads, December, 1864 Such scenes were oft repeated f