Your search returned 212 results in 110 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 15: evacuation of Richmond and the Petersburg lines.--retreat and surrender. (search)
er at Battersea factory pontoon bridge, the latter at Pocahontas and Railroad bridge, and moved-via Bevel's and Goode's bridges on the Appomattox below where it is crossed by the Danville Railroad--to Amelia Court House. Mahone's division was directed to the same point, via Chesterfield Court House. Ewell, commanding the troops in front of Richmond, Kershaw's and Custis Lee's divisions, and the naval brigade, was instructed to cross to the south side of James River, cross the Appomattox at Goode's bridge, and join the army at Amelia Court House. The commands of Pickett and Bushrod Johnson and the cavalry, being west of Petersburg and of the Federal lines, moved up the south bank of the Appomattox. General Lee was not able to concentrate all his troops at Amelia Court House until midday on the 5th, Ewell being the last to arrive. The small army was now divided into four small infantry corps or commands, and a cavalry corps commanded respectively by Longstreet, Ewell, R. H. Anderso
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Defence of batteries Gregg and Whitworth, and the Evacuation of Petersburg. (search)
tory and take the River road, north side of Appomattox, to Bevel's bridge, to-night. Gen. Gordon's corps will cross at Pocahontas and Railroad bridges, his troops taking Hickory road, following Gen. Longstreet to Bevel's bridge, and his wagons taking the Woodpecker road to Old Colville, endeavoring not to interfere with Mahone's Droops from Chesterfield Courthouse, who will take the same road. Gen. Mahone's division will take the road to Chesterfield Codrthouse, thence by Old Colville, to Goode's bridge. Mahone's wagons will precede him on the same road, or take some road to his right. Gen. Ewell's command will cross the James river at and below Richmond, taking the road to Branch church, via Gregory's, to Genito road, via Genito bridge, to Amelia Courthouse. The wagons from Richmond will take the Manchester pike and Buckingham road, via Meadville, to Amelia Courthouse. The movement of all troops will commence at 8 o'clock. The artillery moving out quietly first, infantry fo
37 40 2 116 118 158 McCook's Cavalry, A. C. Nov., ‘63 9th Iowa   15 15 3 176 179 194 Cavalry Seventh.   Light Batteries.                   Aug., ‘61 1st Iowa Reenlisted and served through the war. Griffith's   10 10 1 50 51 61 Steele's Fifteenth. Aug., ‘61 2d Iowa Reenlisted and served through the war. Spoor's   3 3   29 29 32 Tuttle's Fifteenth. Sept., ‘61 3d Iowa Reenlisted and served through the war. Wright's   3 3   34 34 37 E. A. Carr's   Nov., ‘63 4th Iowa Goode's         5 5 5       Infantry.                   May, ‘61 1st Iowa Three-months' regiment; fought at Wilson's Creek. 1 19 20   8 8 28     May, ‘61 2d Iowa Reenlisted and served through the war. 12 108 120 4 159 163 283 Sweeny's Sixteenth. June, ‘61 3d Iowa 8 119 127   122 122 249 Lauman's Sixteenth. June, ‘61 4th Iowa Reenlisted and served through the war. 6 109 115 2 285 287 402 Osterhaus's Fifteenth. July, ‘61 5
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 168.-the burning of Hampton, Va. August 7-8, 1861. (search)
mmand of Capt. Phillips, had gone in the direction of the town, on a search for contraband negroes. The balloonist reported to Gen. Butler that 10,000 men were marching upon Hampton, and in consequence of the report the town was hastily ordered to be evacuated. Two sections of the bridge were torn up by the retreating party. The town was burned to the ground on Wednesday night by the order of Gen. Magruder. The expedition for its destruction was composed of the Mecklenburg Cavalry, Captain Goode, Old Dominion Dragoons, Captain Phillips, York Rangers, Captain Sinclair, Warwick Beauregards, Captain Custis, and six companies of the Fourteenth Virginia regiment, the whole force being under the command of Col. James J. Hodges, of the Fourteenth. The town was most effectually fired. But a single house was left standing. The village church was intended to be spared, but caught fire accidentally, and was consumed to the ground. Many of the members of the companies were citizens of H
overpowering numbers. General Forrest, having sent several messages for the infantry to come up, finally went for them himself, ordering me to hold the position until their arrival. In obeying this order, our loss was about one-fourth of the command, including several officers. Nearly every colonel of the brigade had a horse shot under him. Although the highest praise is due to all the gallant men engaged in this (for cavalry) remarkable fight, I must not omit mentioning particularly Colonel Goode, of the Tenth Confederate cavalry, whose horse was shot, and Captain Arnold, Sixteenth battalion Tennessee cavalry, who was badly wounded. Our next engagement with the enemy was with Colonel Minty's brigade mounted infantry, being a part of the rear-guard of General Rosecrans' army. After driving his skirmishers for more than a mile, we found him strongly posted on Missionary Ridge. We drove him from one fine position, but were unable to dislodge him from the summit; from which, howev
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Defence of Fort Gregg. (search)
force, and fell after the most gallant and desperate defence. Our men bayonetted many of the enemy as they mounted the parapet. After the fall of this battery, the rest of my command along the new line was attacked in front and flank and driven back to the old line of works running northwest from Battery 45, where it remained until the evacuation of Petersburg. We were here rejoined by the Twenty-eighth, under Captain Linebarger. On the afternoon of the 3d, we crossed the Appomattox at Goode's bridge, bivouaced at Amelia Courthouse on the 4th, and on the 5th formed line of battle between Amelia Courthouse and Jetersville, where our sharpshooters, under Major Wooten, became engaged. Next day, while resting in Farmville, we were ordered back to a fortified hill to support our cavalry, which was hard pressed, but before reaching the hill the order was countermanded. We moved rapidly through Farmville, and sustained some loss from the artillery fire while crossing the river near t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 10.92 (search)
ntended to be removed. Several mortars were also brought off. Every piece that was abandoned was first disabled. After making all necessary arrangements with regard to this movement, and seeing all the guns safely across the river, about 2 A. M. of the 3d of April I moved on by the Hickory road, and marched all night. The march on the 3d was very slow and fatiguing, on account of the immense number of carriages with the army. At night I bivouaced on the road-side, about nine miles from Goode's bridge. Amelia Court. house I reached on the morning of the 4th, and immediately proceeded to arrange for reducing the artillery with the troops to a proportionate quantity, and properly to dispose of the surplus. These arrangements were at length effected; and on the 5th General Walker moved to the right, and west of the line of march of the army, having in charge all the artillery not needed with the troops. Ninety-five caissons, mostly loaded, which had early in the winter been sent
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
orce, and fell after the most gallant and desperate defence. Our men bayonetted many of the enemy as they mounted the parapet. After the fall of this battery, the rest of my command along the new line, was attacked in front and flank, and driven back to the old line of works running northwest from Battery 45, where it remained until the evacuation of Petersburg. We were here rejoined by the Twenty-Eighth, under Captain Linebarger. On the afternoon of the 3d we crossed the Appomattox at Goode's bridge, bivouaced at Amelia Courthouse on the 4th, and on the 5th formed line of battle between Amelia Courthouse and Jetersville, where our sharp-shooters, under Major Wooten, became engaged. Next day, while resting in Farmville, we were ordered back to a fortified hill to support our cavalry, which was hard pressed, but before reaching the hill the order was countermanded, we were moved rapidly through Farmville, and sustained some loss from the artillery while crossing the river near t
ox road, separating our troops around the town from those on Hatcher's Run. This has enabled him to extend to the Appomattox, thus inclosing and obliging us to contract our lines to the city. I have directed the troops from the lines on Hatcher's Run, thus severed from us, to fall back toward Amelia Court-House, and I do not see how I can possibly help withdrawing from the city to the north side of the Appomattox tonight. There is no bridge over the Appomattox above this point nearer than Goode's and Bevil's over which the troops above mentioned could cross to the north side, and be made available to us; otherwise I might hold this position for a day or two longer, but would have to evacuate it eventually; and I think it better for us to abandon the whole line on James River to-night, if practicable. I have sent preparatory orders to all the officers, and will be able to tell by night whether or not we can remain here another day; but I think every hour now adds to our difficultie
M. the enemy pressed on the centre, apparently threatening the Norfolk and Petersburg Railroad. The line was, in consequence, closed from the right to support Colonel Goode and 34th Virginia. At the same time Hood's battalion was sent to reinforce Colonel Page, on the left. Again additional troops were called for, the reply bes, but sadly suffered from an enfilade fire. Colonel Page was killed, Captain Wise, Brigade Inspector, wounded. The command of the brigade then devolved upon Colonel Goode. The casualties in Wise's brigade, on June 15th, amounted to 12 killed, 62 wounded, and 129 missing. Only three regiments engaged. Ten guns were lost froy officers and men (for which the officer was duly sentenced). The gun was afterwards manned and officered from Wise's brigade, and did excellent service under Colonel Goode. Major Haskell's mortar-battery, in charge of Captain Lamkin, consisting of four Coehorns, on the Jerusalem plank road, and one Coehorn and two 12-pound mo
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...