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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 5 5 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 3 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 25, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 149 (search)
ble mention of the following officers, who, at the times and places specified, behaved with commendable coolness, gallantry, and bravery: At Kenesaw Mountain, June 27, Capt. W. Powers, Adjutant Adams, First Lieutenants Roberts, Marshall, Graves, Gooding, and Ireland; Second Lieutenants Mayfield, Riggs, Lindson, and Moser. In front of Atlanta, August 7, First Lieutenants Geooding, Graves, and Ireland; Second Lieutenants Riggs, Lindson, Runyan, and Moser. At Jonesborough, September 1, Captain Powers, First Lieutenants Gooding, Ireland; Second Lieutenants Riggs, Moser, Lindson, and Runyan, the latter two of whom were killed while bravely leading their men on to victory. The following enlisted men, for their bravery and heroic conduct, deserve commendation and are recommended for promotion: Sergt. Maj. Elias Downing, Sergts. John Caton, McCune, and Rial, Company F; William H. Golden, B; Sergts. Thomas Jones, H; Tolbert and Corporal Jordan, E. List of casualties: Commissioned
e twenty-seventh, that duty seemed to-day to fall upon the command immediately under General Paine. The forces of the latter consisted of the Eighth New-Hampshire, Captain Barrett, and the Fourth Wisconsin, under Captain Moore, who were in advance as skirmishers. Behind these came five companies of the Fourth Massachusetts and the One Hundred and Tenth New-York, under Captain Bartlett, followed by four companies of the Third brigade. Closely upon these came the Third brigade, under Colonel Gooding, and composed of the Thirty-first Massachusetts, Lieutenant-Colonel Hopkins, Thirty-eighth Massachusetts, Major Richardson, Fifty-third Massachusetts, Colonel Kimball, One Hundred and Fifty-sixth New-York, Colonel Sharpe, and One Hundred and Seventy-fifth New-York, Colonel Bryan, who was killed. Then the Second brigade, under Colonel A. Fearing, and composed of the One Hundred and Thirty-third New-York, Colonel Currie<*> and the One Hundred and Seventy-third New-York, Major Galway, the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Red River campaign. (search)
deral right and hold the Blair's Landing road. The Union troops had rather the advantage of ground, except that the position was easily turned and that they could not stay in it for want of water, of which there was none to be had, and for want of provisions, which were rolling on the way to Grand E]core; the Confederates were fresh and slightly superior in numbers, After the battle, each side claimed to have fought superior numbers. I cannot make out that the Union troops, including Gooding's cavalry, which was not engaged, numbered more than 11,000, nor that the Confederate force was less than 13,000: Taylor says he had 12,000 and attacked twenty odd thousand, and that the third army of the enemy in point of numbers on the theater of war was routed and driven from the field with a loss of at least 10,000 men.--R. B. I. besides being, with good reason, elated by their signal victory of the day before; however, I think this last advantage may fairly be offset by the steadiness
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 13: the capture of New Orleans. (search)
Dan Smith, accompanied by the steamer Harriet Lane, 4 (Porter's flag-ship), and the gun-boat Owasco, Lieutenant Guest, 5. Some were only armed tugs, intended for the purpose of towing the mortar-schooners into position. were in the river, and Butler, with about nine thousand troops, Butler's troops, borne on five transports, consisted of the following regiments: On the Mississippi, the Commanding General and the Twenty-sixth Massachusetts, Colonel Jones; Thirty-first Massachusetts, Colonel Gooding, and Everett's Sixth Massachusetts battery. On the Matanzas, General Phelps, with the Ninth Connecticut, Colonel Cahill, and Holcomb's Second Vermont battery. On the Great Republic, General Williams, with the Twenty-first Indiana, Colonel McMillen; Fourth Wisconsin, Colonel Paine, and Sixth Michigan, Colonel Cortinas. On the North America, the Thirtieth Massachusetts, Colonel Dudley, and a company each of Reed's and Durivage's cavalry. On the Will Farley, the Twelfth Connecticut, Co
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 19: events in Kentucky and Northern Mississippi. (search)
ned his guns upon them, and was fighting gallantly, when Mitchell pushed up Carlin's brigade to the support of Sheridan's right. This force charged at the double quick, broke the line of the Confederates, and drove them through Perryville to the protection of batteries on the bluffs beyond. In this charge the Nationals captured fifteen heavily loaded ammunition wagons, two caissons with their horses, and a train-guard of one hundred and forty men. In the mean time the brigade of Colonel Gooding had been sent to the aid of McCook. Forming on the extreme left of the National line, it fought with great persistence for two hours against odds, and losing full one-third of its number, The brigade numbered only 1,423, and lost 549, killed, wounded, and missing. with its commander, whose horse was shot under him, made prisoner. It was not until about this time (four o'clock in the afternoon) that Buell was aware that a battle of much account — really one of the most sanguinary ba
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 23: siege and capture of Vicksburg and Port Hudson. (search)
d regiment, were detailed as skirmishers. effect a lodgment inside of the Confederate works, and thus prepare the way for the operation of Paine's division. Paine's column advanced to the assault in the following order: In the advance, as skirmishers, the Eighth New Hampshire and Fourth Wisconsin.. Behind these were five companies of the Fourth Massachusetts, One Hundred and Tenth New York, and four companies of the Third Brigade. Closely upon these followed tho Third Brigade, under Colonel Gooding, composed of the Thirty-first, Thirty-eighth, and Fifty-third Massachusetts, and One Hundred and Fifty-sixth and One Hundred and Seventy-fifth New York. Then a part of the Second Brigade, under Colonel Fearing, composed of the One Hundred and Thirty-third and One Hundred and Seventy third New York, the remainder of the brigade being detailed as skirmishers. After the Second Brigade followed the First, under Colonel Ferris, composed of the Twenty-eighth Connecticut (his own), Fourth Ma
ston, cotton. March12.Sch. Kate, Sabistan, Charleston, cotton and lumber. March17.Sch. Laura, Ferklenberg, Charleston, cotton and lumber. March17.Sch. Carrie Sandford, Haggett, St. John's, Fla., naval stores. March17.Sloop Coquette, Moore, Charleston, cotton. March22.Sch. Argyle, Davis, Charleston, cotton and naval stores. March27.Sch. Victoria, Fowler, St. John's, Fla., naval stores. March27.Sch. Annie Deans, Morse, Fernandina, Fla., naval stores. March27.Steamship Nashville, Gooding, Georgetown, S. C., ballast. April2.Sch. Pride, Davis, Georgetown, S. C., cotton. April5.Steamship Economist, Burdge, Charleston, cotton. April5.Sch. Rutherford, Green, Charleston, cotton. April7.Sch. Sarah, Russell, Charleston, cotton. April7.Sch. Acorn, Habenicht, Charleston, cotton. April8.Sch. Louisa, Tolle, Charleston, cotton. April8.Sch. Chase, Habenicht, Charleston cotton. April9.Sch. Elizabeth, Rumley, Charleston, cotton. April10.Steamship Cecile, Carling, Charleston
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Perryville, battle of. (search)
erce charge on the brigade of Lytle, hurling it back with heavy loss. They pressed forward to Gilbert's flank, held by Mitchell and Sheridan. The latter held the king-point of the Union position. He quickly turned his guns on the assailants, when Mitchell sent Carlin's brigade to the support of Sheridan's right. This force charged at the double-quick, broke the Confederate line, and drove them through Perryville to the protection of their batteries on the bluff beyond. Meanwhile, Colonel Gooding's brigade had been sent to the aid of McCook, and fought with great persistence for two hours against odds, losing fully one-third of its number, its commander being made prisoner. General Buell did not know the magnitude of the battle until 4 P. M., when McCook sent a request for reinforcements. They were promptly sent. The conflict ended at dark in a victory for the Nationals, the Confederates having been repulsed at all points, and during the night they retired to Harrodsburg, wh
here, that the Thirtieth and Thirty-first Regiments of Infantry, recruited by General Butler in this Commonwealth, and originally designated by him as the Eastern and Western Bay-State Regiments, were sent from the State to Louisiana without a single commissioned officer. Persons selected by General Butler had been designated by him to act as officers. As many of these persons acted in good faith, and were believed to be competent to command men, Colonel Dudley, of the Thirtieth, and Colonel Gooding, also an army officer, who was commissioned colonel of the Thirty-first, were directed by the Governor, upon joining their regiments in Louisiana, to make a careful examination of the qualifications of the gentlemen acting as officers, and to report to him the names of those who were qualified, that they might receive their commissions. This duty was performed, and, in due time, the officers were properly commissioned. The young gentleman, Mr. Morton, referred to in the above letter,
soldiers. His three brigades included the 30th Mass. Infantry (Colonel Dudley), the 31st (Colonel Gooding), the 2d, 4th and 6th Mass. batteries (Captains Nims, Manning Succeeded, Oct. 20, 1862, eastworks thrown up by the Confederates on each side of the Teche, the brigade commanded by Colonel Gooding of the 31st and including his regiment. The 31st carried some rifle-pits in the wood by a spirited charge, in which they took two officers and eighty-four men prisoners. Colonel Gooding's main line was formed by the 38th Mass. deployed as skirmishers, followed by the 53d Mass., the regimof them and compelled the other two to surrender, and brought them both in as prisoners. Colonel Gooding's report, Official War Records, XV, 348. About this same time, Lieut. Chas. S. Sargent,is in losses came the 53d (Colonel Kimball), which suffered heavily on both days, the 31st (Colonel Gooding), the 49th (Colonel Bartlett), the 4th (Colonel Walker), the 48th (Colonel Stone), the 50th
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