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ri, Lieutenant-Colonel Arnold Beck. Fifteenth Missouri (1), Colonel Joseph Conrad. Fifteenth Missouri (2), Captain Samuel Rexinger. Twenty-second Indiana, Colonel Michael Gooding. Thirty-sixth Illinois, Lieutenant-Colonel Porter C. Olson. Forty-Fourth Illinois, Colonel Wallace W. Barrett. Twenty-fourth Wisconsin, Major Carl von Bau and the old ilag was planted firmly and surely on the last line of works of the enemy, followed by the men, taking one battery of artillery. Report of Colonel Michael Gooding, Twenty-Second Indiana. I pushed men up to the second line of works as fast as possible; on and on, clear to the top, and over the ridge they went, to s we deemed the pursuit of the enemy of greater importance ..... I cannot give too much praise to Captain Powers, Company H, Lieutenant Smith, Company K, Lieutenant Gooding, Company A, and Second Lieutenant Moser, Company G, for their assistance, and for the gallant manner in which they encouraged their men up the side of the m
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Perryville, Ky., October 8th, 1862. (search)
osiah W. Church; C, 1st Ohio, Capt. Daniel K. Southwick; I, 4th U. S., Lieut. Frank G. Smith. Artillery loss: w, 1. Cavalry: 1st Ohio (detachment), Col. Minor Milliken. Ninth division, Brig.-Gen. Robert B. Mitchell. Thirtieth Brigade, Col. Michael Gooding: 59th 111., Maj. Joshua C. Winters; 74th Ill., Lieut.-Col. James B. Kerr; 75th Ill., Lieut.-Col. John E. Bennett; 22d Ind., Lieut.-Col. Squire I. Keith (k); 5th Wis. Battery, Capt. Oscar F. Pinney. Brigade loss: k, 121; w, 314; m, 64=499.f raw regiments.--editors. Perhaps not over one-half of these were actually engaged. General McCook, commanding the First Corps (which bore the brunt of the fight), says that Rousseau had present on the field 7000; Jackson, 5500; the brigade of Gooding [from Mitchell's division of Gilbert's corps] amounting to about 1500. The strength of Crittenden's (Second) and Gilbert's (Third) Corps is not any — where officially stated. Crittenden did not reach the field of action until the conflict was
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
lin river, behind which the enemy were formed for the assault. It turned out that Polk with three divisions, with cavalry on both flanks, had determined to fight a defensive-offensive battle; but as the morning wore away without the attack, which was awaited, Bragg came upon the ground and ordered an assault. It was delivered mainly upon McCook, but also fell heavily upon Sheridan, who repelled it handsomely on his side. McCook fought bravely, and by Gilbert's order was reinforced with Gooding's brigade from Mitchell's division; but he was steadily driven back for a mile, until the enemy's pursuing line came within the enfilading fire of Sheridan's artillery, which was delivered with great effect across the intervening valley of Doctor's Fork. At 4 o'clock Captain Fisher of McCook's staff arrived and reported to me that the left corps had been sustaining a severe conflict for a considerable time, and was being driven back. I was astonished. Not a sound of musketry had been hea
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 1.5 (search)
arlin's brigades of this division were to the right and rear, under cover, and Gooding's brigade was north of Doctor's Creek, near the stream. In this position the Sheridan's right and support him. Directing my course toward the left, I found Gooding's brigade of Mitchell's division still standing to the left of Doctor's Creek,with his leading brigade (Walker's). This he was ordered to deploy, to replace Gooding. In the midst of these movements, another staff-officer, Captain W. T. Hoblitgence. Accordingly I sent my adjutant-general, Captain J. E. Stacy, to recall Gooding and order him to proceed under the guidance of Captain Hoblitzell to report to General McCook. Gooding took with him Pinney's Wisconsin battery. Within twenty minutes after receiving the order, Gooding made himself felt on the flank of the CGooding made himself felt on the flank of the Confederates, who had thus far been steadily driving Rousseau's troops back toward the Russell House. Within a few minutes after this brigade had started, Sheridan,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Stone's River, Tenn. (search)
e. Staff and escort loss: k, 4; w, 5 = 9. right wing, Maj.-Gen. Alexander McD. McCook. First (late Ninth) division, Brig.-Gen. Jefferson C. Davis. Escort: Cavalry Co. B, 36th Ill., Capt. Samuel B. Sherer; G, 2d Ky. Cav., Capt. Miller R. McCulloch (k), Lieut. Harvey S. Park. Escort loss: k, 1; w, 4; m, 6 = 11. First (late Thirtieth) Brigade, Col. P. Sidney Post: 59th Ill., Capt. Hendrick E. Paine; 74th Ill., Col. Jason Marsh; 75th Ill., Lieut.-Col. John E. Bennett; 22d Ind., Col. Michael Gooding. Brigade loss: k, 25; w, 144; m, 155 = 324. Second (late Thirty-first) Brigade, Col. William P. Carlin: 21st Ill., Col. J. W. S. Alexander (w), Lieut.-Col. Warren E. McMackin; 38th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Daniel H. Gilmer; 101st Ohio, Col. Leander Stem (m w and c), Lieut.-Col. Moses F. Wooster (m w and c), Maj. Isaac M. Kirby, Capt. Bedan B. McDonald; 15th Wis., Col. Hans C. Heg. Brigade loss: k, 129; w, 498; m, 194 = 821. Third (late Thirty-second) Brigade, Col. William E. Woodruff: 25th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Opposing forces in the Chattanooga campaign. November 23d-27th, 1863. (search)
is H. Waters; 9th Ind., Col. Isaac C. B. Suman; 36th Ind., Maj. Gilbert Trusler; 24th Ohio, Capt. George M. Bacon. Brigade loss: k, 4; w, 60==64. Second division, Maj.-Gen. Philip H. Sheridan. First Brigade, Col. Francis T. Sherman: 36th Ill., Col. Silas Miller, Temporarily in command of a demi-brigade. Lieut.-Col. Porter C. Olson; 44th 111., Col. Wallace W. Barrett; 73d Ill., Col. James F. Jaques; 74th Ill., Col. Jason Marsh; 88th Ill., Lieut.-Col. George W. Chandler; 22d Ind., Col. Michael Gooding; 2d Mo., Col. Bernard Laiboldt, Temporarily in command of a demi-brigade. Lieut.-Col. Arnold Beck; 15th Mo., Col. Joseph Conrad (w), Capt. Samuel Rexinger; 24th Wis., Maj. Carl von Baumbach. Brigade loss: k, 30; w, 268; m, 3==301. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. George D. Wagner: 100th Ill., Maj. Chas. M. Hammond; 15th Ind., Col. Gustavus A. Wood, Temporarily in command of a demi-brigade. Maj. Frank White (w), Capt. Benjamin F. Hegler; 40th Ind., Lieut.-Col. Elias Neff; 57th Ind., L
tenant-Colonel Meikel was killed at Petersburg. Twenty-Second Indiana Infantry. McCook's Brigade — Davis's Division--Fourteenth Corps. (1) Col. Jeff. C. Davis, R. A.; Bvt. Major-Gen., U. S. A. (3) Col. William M. Wiles. (2) Col. Michael Gooding. (4) Col. Thomas Shea companies. killed and died of wounds. died of disease, accidents, in Prison, &c. Total Enrollment. Officers. Men. Total. Officers. Men. Total. Field and Staff 3   3       16 Company A   12 12   18 18 18of Corinth, after which it was stationed in Northern Mississippi until August, 1862, when it marched with Buell on the Kentucky campaign. At the battle of Chaplin Hills, Ky., October 8, 1862, the regiment was in Mitchell's (R. B.) Division; Colonel Gooding commanded the brigade, and Lieutenant-Colonel Keith the regiment. Keith fell dead, at the head of his men, while waving his sword and cheering on the line. The casualties in the regiment were 49 killed, 87 wounded, and 33 missing,
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the war in the South-West. (search)
k after an insignificant engagement. They had gathered useful information as to the enemy's positions. Two days after, Gooding's brigade of cavalry, passing on the left bank of Red River, attacked and put to flight a detachment of the Southern cahirteenth and Nineteenth corps, and directed this general to set forward the following day with all his troops. Leaving Gooding's brigade to cover the infantry's flank, General Lee left Natchitoches for Pleasant Hill with about thirty-three hundred position await the enemy without fear. Banks had around him twelve to thirteen thousand experienced infantry soldiers; Gooding's brigade of cavalry, which had not been engaged; and a numerous artillery. Unfortunately, there was a lack of water. vances without any sign of the enemy's disposition to take the offensive. It is known, however, that he is not far, for Gooding's cavalry have found him strong beyond the ravine. A few rifle-shots, partial movements to rectify positions, do not su
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Addenda by the Editor. (search)
ol. P. Sidney Post. 59th IllinoisLieut.-col. Joshua C. Winters. 74th IllinoisLieut.-col. James B. Kerr. 75th IllinoisCol. John E. Bennett. 22d IndianaCol. Michael Gooding. Second Brigade. Brig.-gen. William P. Carlin. 21st IllinoisCol. John W. S. Alexander. 38th IllinoisCol. Daniel H. Gilmer. 81st IndianaCol. Willain. Col. P. Sidney Post. 59th IllinoisLieut.-col. Joshua C. Winters. 74th IllinoisCol. Jason Marsh. 75th IllinoisCol. John E. Bennett. 22d IndianaCol. Michael Gooding. Wisconsin Light Artillery, 5th BatteryCapt. George Q. Gardner. Second Brigade. Brig.-gen. William P. Carlin. 21st IllinoisCol. John W. S. AlexandllinoisCol. Wallace W. Barrett. 73d IllinoisCol. James F. Jaquess. 74th IllinoisCol. Jason Marsh. 88th IllinoisLieut.-col. Geo. W. Chandler. 22d IndianaCol. Michael Gooding. 2d MissouriCol. Bernard Laiboldt. Temporarily in command of a demi-brigade. Lieut.-col. Arnold Beck. 15th MissouriCol. Joseph Conrad. Capt. Samuel