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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for M. Gooding or search for M. Gooding in all documents.

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mistaken by a company of their own men for charging rebels, and received their fire, killing a few of their horses only, we believe. We heard, after leaving the field, that two of Gen. Pope's staff were killed by rebel fire during the latter part of the engagement, but were then without any means of verifying the fact. Our loss of regimental and company officers was very heavy. Among those killed were Col. Crane, of the Third Wisconsin; Major Savage, and Captains Abbott, Russell, and Gooding, and Lieut. Browning, of the Second Massachusetts. Col. Donnelly, of the Forty-sixth Pennsylvania, was, we fear, mortally wounded. Col. Creighton and Adjutant Molyneau, of the Seventh Ohio, are also very badly wounded. Captain Robert W. Clarke, of the First District regiment, received a wound in the foot. Gen. Augur received a Minieball in his back, as he was in front of his division turning in his saddle to cheer it on. Gen. Geary is wounded in the arm so that he will likely lose it, an
mistaken by a company of their own men for charging rebels, and received their fire, killing a few of their horses only, we believe. We heard, after leaving the field, that two of Gen. Pope's staff were killed by rebel fire during the latter part of the engagement, but were then without any means of verifying the fact. Our loss of regimental and company officers was very heavy. Among those killed were Col. Crane, of the Third Wisconsin; Major Savage, and Captains Abbott, Russell, and Gooding, and Lieut. Browning, of the Second Massachusetts. Col. Donnelly, of the Forty-sixth Pennsylvania, was, we fear, mortally wounded. Col. Creighton and Adjutant Molyneau, of the Seventh Ohio, are also very badly wounded. Captain Robert W. Clarke, of the First District regiment, received a wound in the foot. Gen. Augur received a Minieball in his back, as he was in front of his division turning in his saddle to cheer it on. Gen. Geary is wounded in the arm so that he will likely lose it, an
and in a small skirt of timber to the right. Gooding's attack, assisted by Pinney's battery, drovetion of Russell's house. In this attack, Colonel Gooding's gallant brigade lost in killed and wounn five thousand five hundred. The brigade of Gooding amounted to about fifteen hundred. The battl the action, as did the entire brigade of Colonel Gooding, sent me from Gen. Robert B. Mitchell's dbrigades as follows: the Thirtieth brigade, Col. Gooding, Twenty-second Indiana volunteers, commandithe time Colonel Carlin's brigade advanced, Col. Gooding's (Thirtieth) brigade was ordered by Gen. Gident intention of turning his position. Col. Gooding proceeded with his brigade to the left, andncluding Major Kilgore wounded severely. Col. Gooding, during the temporary confusion produced byl Commanding Ninth Brigade. Report of Colonel Gooding. headquarters Thirtieth brigade, Niny, I am, General, Your obedient servant, M. Gooding, Colonel Commanding Thirtieth Brigade R[4 more...]